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18c database creation on Windows

Hopefully you’ve followed my very simple and easy guide to downloading the 18c database software for Windows. But of course, software on its own is not much use – we need a database! So let’s get cracking and create one. Using the Start menu like I’ve done below, or using the Windows panels, locate the Database Configuration assistant and start it.

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After a few seconds the initial screen will ask what you want to do.  Choose “Create Database”.

18c Database installation on Windows

If you’re a Windows enterprise, or you want to run your 18c database on your Windows laptop/desktop for research and education, then there has been some good news this week.  The software is now available to you on the OTN network page.  Here’s a walk through of the software installation process

Head to the standard database downloads page

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/database/enterprise-edition/downloads/index.html

Accept the license agreement and choose the Windows version to download

Oracle 12cR2 on Windows: Virtual Accounts

Oracle Database 12.2.0.1 is released for Windows, just 2 weeks after the Linux release, and this is a very good news. Let’s see something new you will encounter in the first screens of Oracle 12.2 installer. Don’t worry, the default choice is the right one. But better understand it.

SYSTEM

On Linux, you don’t install Oracle Database as root. You create a user, usually called oracle, which will be the owner of the database files and the instance processes and shared memory. This looks obvious be before 12c the Oracle Instance is running as the root equivalent, the built-in SYSTEM user. This was very bad from a security point of view: running a software with the most powerful user on the system.

Installing EM13c on Windows Tips

I just built out my own EM13c environment so I can answer many questions that I won’t be able to ignore just because I no longer work at Oracle.

UltraEdit 23 for Windows

UltraEdit 23 for Windows has been released. Followers of the blog will know I’m an UltraEdit junkie, so as soon as I got the email telling me UltraEdit 23 had arrived I installed it instantly. Fools rush in where angels fear to tread!

The glaring hideousness you are presented with is a ribbon! For ***** sake! Hasn’t the whole world spent enough time moaning about the Office ribbons already?

uedit23

Captain Support and Windows 8…

Captain Support was getting pretty sick of supporting the crappy old laptops his brother and mother were using, so he selfishly bought them 2 shiny new laptops to make his own life easier. The only slight flaw in the plan was they came with Windows 8. Although Captain Support had some previous experience of Windows 8 (Developer Preview, Consumer Preview, Windows Blue beta), he was a little nervous about unleashing it on his unsuspecting family members…

Oracle 12cR1 RAC Installation on Windows 2012 Using VirtualBox…

After having a play with Oracle 12c on Windows 8, I decided to give Windows Server 2012 a go. Here is the resulting virtual RAC installation.

As you would expect, much of the process is pretty similar to the 11gR2 RAC installation on Windows 2008.

Managing Oracle on Windows: Where’s my Oratab?

If you manage Oracle on Windows, you probably have wondered why it is so difficult to work out which Oracle instances are running and which ORACLE_HOMEs they use. On Unix or Linux, this is a very simple task.  Oracle services and their ORACLE_HOMEs are listed in the oratab file, located in /etc/ on most platforms and in /var/opt/oracle/ on Solaris.  To find what is running, we would usually use the ‘ps’ command and pipe it through grep to find and run PMON processes.

On Windows, it just isn’t this easy. Each Oracle instance runs in a single monolithic oracle.exe process. Nothing about the process indicates the name of the instance. When we want to find all of the configured Oracle services, we can use the ‘sc’ command, and pipe the results through find (I have added emphasis to the ASM and database instances):

Windows PowerShell…

Followers of the blog know I’m a Linux fan, but over the weekend I needed to fix some stuff on a Windows server at work and I took my first tentative steps into the world of Windows PowerShell. It was very much a case of “scripting by Google”, but I managed to get the job done pretty quickly. That episode prompted this tweet.

powershell-tweet-1

That resulted in two little exchanges. The first from Niall Litchfield, who must have been a little under the weather. :)

UltraEdit v19 for Windows

For all those folks who are forced to use Windows, you might be interested to know UltraEdit v19 has just been released.

You can check out the new features here.

The latest version for Mac/Linux is still 3.3, so maybe we are due a new version there too?

Cheers

Tim…