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utl_file

UTL_FILE_DIR and 18c revisited

A couple of years back (wow…time flies!) I made a video and a post about the de-support of UTL_FILE_DIR in 18c. This was good thing because the number of people opting for “utl_file_dir=*” in their init.ora file, and hence opening themselves up to all sorts of risks seemed to be large! (The post elaborates on this more with an example of erasing your database with a short UTL_FILE script Smile)

The death of UTL_FILE – part 2

I wrote a post a while back call “The Death of UTL_FILE”, and probably because of it’s click-bait title I got lots of feedback, so I’m back to flog that horse Smile. Seriously though, I stand behind my assertion in that post, that the majority of usages of UTL_FILE I’ve seen my career are mimicking the spooling behaviour of a SQL*Plus script. And as that post pointed out, you can now achieve that functionality directly with the scheduler.

That is well and good for writing files from the database, and I added:

ORACLE_HOME with symbolic link and postupgrade_fixups

By Franck Pachot

.
Here is a quick post you may google into if you got the following error when running postupgrade_fixups.sql after an upgrade:

ERROR - Cannot open the preupgrade_messages.properties file from the directory object preupgrade_dir
DECLARE
*
ERROR at line 1:
ORA-29283: invalid file operation
ORA-06512: at "SYS.DBMS_PREUP", line 3300
ORA-06512: at "SYS.UTL_FILE", line 536
ORA-29283: invalid file operation
ORA-06512: at "SYS.UTL_FILE", line 41
ORA-06512: at "SYS.UTL_FILE", line 478
ORA-06512: at "SYS.DBMS_PREUP", line 3260
ORA-06512: at "SYS.DBMS_PREUP", line 9739
ORA-06512: at line 11

UTL_FILE_DIR and 18c

I wrote a blog post called The Death of UTL_FILE which attracted a comment from a reader:

“There is NO chance to stay at UTL_FILE as it is DESUPPORTED starting with database Version 18c”

This is not the case, but since I wanted to clarify what has changed in 18c, it warrants this small but separate blog post. When UTL_FILE first into existence in Oracle 7, the concept of directory object did not apply to UTL_FILE. Clearly we could not just let UTL_FILE to write to any destination, otherwise a malicious person could write a little PL/SQL block like this:

The death of UTL_FILE

In a previous post I covered a technique to improve the performance of UTL_FILE, but concluded the post with a teaser: “you probably don’t need to use UTL_FILE ever again”.

image

Time for me to back that statement up with some concrete evidence.

UTL_FILE can read and write files. This blog post will cover the writing functionality of UTL_FILE and why I think you probably don’t need UTL_FILE for this. I’ll come back to UTL_FILE to read files in a future post.

Juicing up UTL_FILE

Think about your rubbish bin for a second. Because, clearly this is going to be an oh so obvious metaphor leading into UTL_FILE right?  OK, maybe a little explanation is needed. I have a basket next to my desk into which I throw any waste paper. It is where I throw my stupid ideas and broken dreams Smile