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New 12c Default: Controlfile Autobackup On – But only for Multitenant

This a a little discovery from my present Oracle Database 12c New Features course in Copenhagen: The default setting for Controlfile Autobackup has changed to ON – but only for Multitenant, apparently:

Creating Controlfile From Scratch when No Backup is Available

You have lost the controlfile, the catalog and the backup to the controlfile too; so restoring the controlfile from a previous backup is not an option. How can you recover the database? By creating the controlfile from scratch. Interested in learning how? Read on.

How to Get the DBID when Instance in in NOMOUNT State

You lost your controlfile and the catalog. To restore the controlfile, you must know the DBID. Did you follow the advise to write down the DBID in a safe place? You didn't, did you? Well, what do you do next? Don't worry; you can still get the DBID from the header of the data files. Read on to learn how.

If you have lost your controlfile and the catalog database (or the database was not registered to a recovery catalog anyway), you  need to restore the controlfile first and then restore the other files. I wrote a blog post on that activity earlier. In summary, here is what you need to do to restore the controlfile from the backup:

Restoring Controlfile When AUTOBACKUP Fail

Allow me to present the snapshot of a day from the life of John--the DBA at Acme Bank. On this particular day a database John manages crashed entirely and had to be restored from the backup. He takes regular (backupset) RMAN backups to tape. Since everything--including the controlfile--had crashed, John had to first restore the controlfile and then restore the database. The controlfile is always backed up with the backup database command. John was sure of that. However, restore controlfile from autobackup gave the error:

RMAN-06172: no AUTOBACKUP found or specified handle is not a valid copy or piece

Without the controlfile, the recovery was stuck, even though all the valid pieces were there. It was a rather alarming situation. Others would have panicked; but not John. As always, he managed to resolve the situation by completing recovery. Interested to learn how? Read on.

Oracle RMAN Restore to the Same Machine as the Original Database

Among the most critical but often most neglected database administration tasks is testing restore from backup. But sometimes, you don’t have a test system handy, and need to test the restore on the same host as the source database. In such situations, the biggest fear is overwriting the original database. Here is a simple procedure you can follow, which will not overwrite the source.

Duplicate from the standby instead from the primary in 12c

This post is related to 12c and an active database duplication for a standby I did in my lab environment. I’d say although I first encountered it on 12c there is a chance you run into a similar situation with earlier releases too.

I would normally use ASM for all my databases to make my life easier but this time I had to be mindful of the available memory on the laptop-which at 8 GB-is not plenty. So I went with file system setup instead. After the initial preparations I was ready to launch the one-liner on the standby database:

RMAN> duplicate target database for standby from active database;

This worked away happily for a few moments only to come to an abrupt halt with the below error message. I have started the duplication process on the standby.

Duplicate from the standby instead from the primary in 12c

This post is related to 12c and an active database duplication for a standby I did in my lab environment. I’d say although I first encountered it on 12c there is a chance you run into a similar situation with earlier releases too.

I would normally use ASM for all my databases to make my life easier but this time I had to be mindful of the available memory on the laptop-which at 8 GB-is not plenty. So I went with file system setup instead. After the initial preparations I was ready to launch the one-liner on the standby database:

RMAN> duplicate target database for standby from active database;

This worked away happily for a few moments only to come to an abrupt halt with the below error message. I have started the duplication process on the standby.

Recovering a standby over the network in 12c

Another one of the cool but underrated features in 12c is the possibility to recover a physical standby over the network with one line in RMAN.

Why do you need to perform this activity? Assume someone really clever created a segment “nologging” and the database was not in force logging mode. This operation cannot be replicated by redo apply on the standby, and you are bound to have a problem. Or, in my case, I had the standby shut down in my lab environment (intentionally) and created a few PDBs on my primary. For some reason I lost an archived redo log. This would of course not happen in a production environment, but my lab VM is limited when it comes to space and I may have moved my backup to a USB disk that I didn’t bring along.

Recovering a standby over the network in 12c

Another one of the cool but underrated features in 12c is the possibility to recover a physical standby over the network with one line in RMAN.

Why do you need to perform this activity? Assume someone really clever created a segment “nologging” and the database was not in force logging mode. This operation cannot be replicated by redo apply on the standby, and you are bound to have a problem. Or, in my case, I had the standby shut down in my lab environment (intentionally) and created a few PDBs on my primary. For some reason I lost an archived redo log. This would of course not happen in a production environment, but my lab VM is limited when it comes to space and I may have moved my backup to a USB disk that I didn’t bring along.

Oracle 12c - incremental backup for DataGuard over network

If you have DataGuard or standby database in your organization you probably will love that new RMAN feature. Since 12c it is possible to catchup standby database using incremental backup using one command. Additional space and time need to run incremental backup, copy over to standby and restore can be limited to time required to run incremental backup over network.

See short example:

Stopping recovery on standby 

[oracle@ip-10-0-1-79 ~]$ sqlplus / as sysdba
SQL*Plus: Release 12.1.0.1.0 Production on Sun Jul 7 12:56:24 2013
Copyright (c) 1982, 2013, Oracle. All rights reserved.

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