Search

Top 60 Oracle Blogs

Recent comments

Oracle

The Oracle Wait Interface Is Useless – News About Part Two

As many have probably noticed, the blogging experiment with Tanel hasn’t been quite as productive as it might optimally have been. Tanel doesn’t currently have the time to write part two of this article, so I’ll I’m going to pick up the baton and write the next part. Watch this space!

Dropping interval partitions

One of the nice Oracle11g new features is interval partitioning which is an extension to range partitioning. The advantage of interval partitioning over range partitioning is that new partitions are created automatically when new rows are inserted which don’t belong in an existing partition. The question, however, is how to get rid of old partitions? […]

Partway Researched With A Chance Of FUD

I tend to keep the content of this blog fairly technical and engineering focused, but every now and then I have to venture off and do an editorial post.  Recently some of the ParAccel management decided to fire up the FUD machine on the ParAccel blog and take aim at Oracle’s Exadata making the following claims: “There are 12 SAS disks in the storage server with a speed of about 75 MB/s [The SUN Oracle Exadata Storage Server datasheet claims 125 MB/s but we think that is far-fetched.]” -Rick Glick, Vice President of Technology and Architecture (link) “We stand by the 75MB/sec as a conservative, reliable number. We see higher numbers in disk tests, but never anywhere near 125MB/sec.” -Barry Zane, Chief Technology Officer (link) Far Fetched Or Fact? As a database performance engineer, I strive to be extremely detailed and well researched with my work. Clearly, these comments from Rick and Barry were not well researched as is evident from information publicly available on the Internet. The first bit of documentation I would research before making such comments would be the hard disk drive specification sheet. The 12 drives in the Exadata Storage Server, a Sun Fire X4275, are [...]

2009 Year-End Zeitgeist

Another year in the books and another year on the Structured Data blog.  Hopefully 2009 treated you well and 2010 will bring good things in addition.  I thought I’d throw a few Top 5 lists together to reminisce about 2009.  Enjoy! Top 5 Most Visited Blog Posts of 2009 DBMS_STATS, METHOD_OPT and FOR ALL INDEXED COLUMNS Choosing An Optimal Stats Gathering Strategy Top 10 Oracle 11gR2 New Features Troubleshooting Bad Execution Plans Oracle 11g: Real-Time SQL Monitoring Using DBMS_SQLTUNE.REPORT_SQL_MONITOR Top 5 Most Popular Search Queries of 2009 structured data oracle 11gr2 new features db_file_multiblock_read_count oracle analytic functions dbms_stats method_opt

50+ SQL Performance Optimization scenarios

Before the year ends I’d like to share some good stuff…

I have never seen a huge compilation of SQL tuning tips or rewrite scenarios (with test cases) and got them only on OracleFans forum… ooops… so you can’t read Chinese? try this translated version, whew.. good thing Google has this translate service that I am able to read in Chinese.. </p />
</p></div>

    	  	<div class=

The “Do What You Love” Mirage

I am inspired by having read an article called “Do what you love mirage” by Denis Basaric. It begins...

“Do what you love” is advice I hear exclusively from financially secure people. And it rings hollow to me. When you need money to survive, you do any work that is available, love does not play into that choice. Desperation does.

Please read it before you go on.

Welcome back.

This article puts a very important cycle within my life into words. I believe, as Denis says, that a lot of times, we get the cause-effect relationship mixed up when we think about loving what we do.

I love what I do. Well, a lot of it. But Denis is right: I didn’t choose what I do out of love. I chose what I love out of doing. Some examples:

The Core Performance Fundamentals Of Oracle Data Warehousing – Balanced Hardware Configuration

[back to Introduction] If you want to build a house that will stand the test of time, you need to build on a solid foundation. The same goes for architecting computer systems that run databases. If the underlying hardware is not sized appropriately it will likely lead to people blaming software. All too often I [...]

Oracle Database 11g Release 2 for HP-UX Itanium and AIX (PPC64) Now Available

The HP-UX Itanium and AIX (PPC64) ports of Oracle Database 11g Release 2 can now be downloaded from OTN. Happy Holidays!!! Tweet This Post

My Whole System Is Slow. Now What?

At CMG'09 a couple of weeks ago, I presented "Measuring Response Times of Code on Oracle Systems." The paper for this presentation was a subset of "For Developers: Making Friends with the Oracle Database." In the presentation, I spent a few minutes talking about why to measure response times in Oracle, and then I spent a lot of minutes talking about how. As usual, I focused heavily on the importance of measuring response times of individual business tasks executed by individual end users.

Kernel NFS fights back… Oracle throughput matches Direct NFS with latest Solaris improvements

After my recent series of postings, I was made aware of David Lutz’s blog on NFS client performance with Solaris.  It turns out that you can vastly improve the performance of NFS clients using a new parameter to adjust the number of client connections.

root@saemrmb9> grep rpcmod /etc/system
set rpcmod:clnt_max_conns=8

This parameter was introduced in a patch for various flavors of Solaris.  For details on the various flavors, see David Lutz’s recent blog entry on improving NFS client performance.  Soon, it should be the default in Solaris making out-of-box client performance scream.

DSS query throughput with Kernel NFS

I re-ran the DSS query referenced in my last entry and now kNFS matches the throughput of dNFS with 10gigE.


Kernel NFS throughput with Solaris 10 Update 8 (set rpcmod:clnt_max_conns=8)

This is great news for customers not yet on Oracle 11g.  With this latest fix to Solaris, you can match the throughput of Direct NFS on older versions of Oracle.  In a future post, I will explore the CPU impact of dNFS and kNFS with OLTP style transactions.

Posted in Oracle, Storage Tagged: 11g, 7410, analytics, database, dNFS, NAS, NFS, Oracle, performance, Solaris, Sun, tuning