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Video : Vagrant Oracle Real Application Clusters (RAC) Build

In today’s video we’ll discuss how to build a 2-node RAC setup using Vagrant.

This video is based on the OL8 19c RAC build, but it’s similar to that of the OL7 19c RAC build also. If you don’t have access to the patches from MOS, stick with the OL7 build, as it will work with the 19.3 base release. The GitHub repos are listed here.

If you need some more words to read, you can find descriptions of the builds here, as well as a beginners guide to Vagrant.

Video : Using Podman With Existing Dockerfiles (Oracle Database and ORDS)

Today’s video shows me using some of my existing Docker builds with Podman. Specifically a 19c database container and an Oracle REST Data Services (ORDS) container.

For those with an understanding of Docker, it should look really familiar, but it does introduce a twist in the form of a pod.

The video is based on this article.

You can see more information about containers here.

Oracle Database 19c RAC On OL8 Using Vagrant

On Sunday 17th May I started the process of putting together a Vagrant build of Oracle 19c RAC on Oracle Linux 8 (OL8.2 + EUK). I figured it would take me about 20 minutes to amend my existing OL7 build, but it took the whole of that Sunday, every evening for the following week, and the whole of the following Saturday and Sunday to complete it. There were some late nights, so from an hours perspective it well over 5 days of work. Most of that time would have been completely unnecessary if I wasn’t an idiot.

First things first. The result of that effort was this build on GitHub, with an associated article on my website describing the build in more detail.

Oracle Linux 8 (OL8) : Podman

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When Oracle Linux 8 (OL8) was released, one of the first things I did was check for the Oracle supplied Docker engine. Nothing.

Getting rid of annoying, repetitive messages in /var/log/messages

The primary source of information regarding any change or issue on a linux system is the /var/log/messages file. I am often annoyed when a linux system is setup in such a way that certain messages are written to syslog with a high frequency swamping the messages file with information that is not important. The reason for my annoyance is that this makes it very hard to actually spot important information because you have to skip through a lot of lines before you find the important information, especially if you do not know for sure if there a message in the first place.

Please mind this blogpost is created on a Centos 7 server which uses rsyslog.

There are a couple of ways to manage this. The standard syslog way of managing this is the following, which can be found in /etc/rsyslog.conf:

Video: Oracle Linux Virtual Machine (VM) on Amazon Web Services (AWS)

Continuing the cloud theme, here is a quick run through of the process of creating an Oracle Linux virtual machine on Amazon Web Services (AWS).

A few months ago I wrote an article about installing an Oracle database on AWS.

I updated the images in that article last night to bring them in line with this video.

Video: Oracle Linux Virtual Machine (VM) on Micorosft Azure

The interface for Microsoft Azure has been re-jigged since I last did screen shots, so I did a run through of creating an Oracle Linux VM and recorded it for my channel.

I also updated the associated article.

Cheers

Tim…

Oracle Linux : UEK4 Released

linux-tuxI wrote a post a couple of months ago called
Which version of Oracle Linux should I pick for Oracle server product installations? One of the points I raised was the use of UEK allows you to have all the latest kernel goodies, regardless of being on an older release, like OL6.

I saw a post today about the release of UEK4, so now you have access to all the improvements in the 4.1 mainline Linux kernel, whether you are on are running OL6 or OL7. That just goes to prove the point really.

Docker on Oracle Linux

As a reminder for myself and for those who might have missed the info. Here…

Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7 Released

It feels almost like heresy to discus something that isn’t Oracle-related on the day that Oracle announced the new In-Memory Database Option, but something else was also released today. Red Hat gave birth to Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7.

I’m a big fan of all things Linux. I’m typing this blog post on a Fedora 20 desktop at home. I’m a rabid fan of Oracle Linux for servers at home and at work. As a result, the birth of RHEL7 is a pretty big deal for me.