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Method R

And now, ...the video

First, I want to thank everyone who responded to my prior blog post and its accompanying survey, where I asked when video is better than a paper. As I mentioned already in the comment section for that blog post, the results were loud and clear: 53.9% of respondents indicated that they’d prefer reading a paper, and 46.1% indicated that they’d prefer watching a video. Basically a clean 50/50 split.

The comments suggested that people have a lower threshold for “polish” with a video than with a paper, so one of the ideas to which I’ve needed to modify my thinking is to just create decent videos and publish them without expending a lot of effort in editing.

But how?

Gwen Shapira on SSD

If you haven’t seen Gwen Shapira’s article about de-confusing SSD, I recommend that you read it soon.

One statement stood out as an idea on which I wanted to comment:

If you don’t see significant number of physical reads and sequential read wait events in your AWR report, you won’t notice much performance improvements from using SSD.

I wanted to remind you that you can do better. If you do notice a significant number of physical reads and sequential write wait events in your AWR report, then it’s still not certain that SSD will improve the performance of the task whose performance you’re hoping to improve. You don’t have to guess about the effect that SSD will have upon any business task you care about. In 2009, I wrote a blog post that explains.

I Can Help You Trace It

The first product I ever created after leaving Oracle Corporation in 1999 was a 3-day course about optimizing Oracle performance.

Why KScope?

Early this year, my friend Mike Riley from ODTUG asked me to write a little essay in response to the question, “Why Kscope?” that he could post on the ODTUG blog. He agreed that cross-posting would help the group reach more people, so I’ve reproduced my response to that question here. I’ll hope to see you at Kscope11 in Long Beach June 26–30. If you develop applications for Oracle systems, you need to be there.

MR: Why KScope?

My Actual OTN Interview

And now, the actual OTN interview (9:11) is online. Thank you, Justin; it was a lot of fun. And thank you to Oracle Corporation for another great show. It's an ever-growing world we work in, and I'm thrilled to be a part of it.

New Method R Blogs

Today we installed two new blogs over at our method-r.com web page. We created them to give us—all of us at Method R—a place to talk about our products and professional experiences. I hope you'll come have a look.

I'll still be posting here, too.

My OTN Interview at OOW2010 (which hasn’t happened yet)

Yesterday, Justin Kestelyn from Oracle Technology Network sent me a note specifying some logistics for our OTN interview together called “Coding for Performance, with Cary Millsap.” It will take place at Oracle OpenWorld on Monday, September 20 at 11:45am Pacific Time.

One of Justin’s requests in his note was, “Topics: Please suggest 5 topics for discussion?” So, I thought for a couple of minutes about questions I’d like him to ask me, and I wrote down the first one. And then I thought to myself that I might as well write down the answer I would hope to say to this; maybe it’ll help me remember everything I want to say. Then I wrote another question, and the answer just flowed, and then another, and another. Fifteen minutes later, I had the whole thing written out.

Mister Trace

For the past several weeks, my team at Method R have been working hard on a new software tool that we released today. It is an extension for Oracle SQL Developer called Method R Trace. We call it MR Trace for short.

MR Trace is for SQL and PL/SQL developers who care about performance. Every time you execute code from a SQL Developer worksheet, MR Trace automatically copies a carefully scoped trace file to your SQL Developer workstation. There, you can open it with any application you want, just by clicking. You can tag it for easy lookup later. There’s a 3-minute video if you’re interested in seeing what it looks like.

My Whole System Is Slow. Now What?

At CMG'09 a couple of weeks ago, I presented "Measuring Response Times of Code on Oracle Systems." The paper for this presentation was a subset of "For Developers: Making Friends with the Oracle Database." In the presentation, I spent a few minutes talking about why to measure response times in Oracle, and then I spent a lot of minutes talking about how. As usual, I focused heavily on the importance of measuring response times of individual business tasks executed by individual end users.

a long overdue thank you

The past year has been well, many words come to mind but let's go with challenging. It's also been interesting, frustrating, enlightening, exhausting, but right about now, it feels like it was a very, very good year. Those of you that have read through the previous posts will remember that, right around the time I left for the Miracle Oracle Open World conference in October of 2008, I was