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Locks

Lock Types

Every now and again I have to check what a particular lock (or enqueue) type is for and what the associated parameter values represent. This often means I have to think about the names of a couple of views and a collection of columns – then create a few column formats to make the output readable (though sometimes I can take advantage of the “print_table()” procedure that Tom Kyte a long time ago.  It’s only takes a little time to get the code right, but it’s a nuisance when I’m in a hurry so I’ve just scribbled out a few lines of a script that takes a lock type as an input parameter and reports all the information I want.

Result cache invalidation caused by DML locks

In a previous post about Result Cache, I was using ‘set autotrace on’ in my session to see when the result cache hit saves the logical reads. I got a comment, by e-mail and with full test case, mentioning that the invalidation I had when doing some DML does not occur when autotrace is set to off. I reproduced the problem, on 18c because I use my cloud services to do my tests, but it works the same way in 12c.

I’ll focus here on DML which does not modify any rows from the table the result depends on, because this is the case that depends on the session transaction context. When rows are modified, the result is always invalidated.

RI Locks

RI = Referential Integrity: also known informally as parent/child integrity, and primary (or unique) key/foreign key checking.

I’m on a bit of a roll with things that I must have explained dozens or even hundreds of times in different environments without ever formally explaining them on my blog. Here’s a blog item I could have done with to response to  a question that came up on the OTN database forum over the weekend.

What happens in the following scenario:

Flashback Logging

One of the waits that is specific to ASSM (automatic segment space management) is the “enq: FB – contention” wait. You find that the “FB” enqueue has the following description and wait information when you query v$lock_type, and v$event_name:

Deadlocks

A recent question on the OTN forum asked about narrowing down the cause of deadlocks, and this prompted me to set up a little example. Here’s a deadlock graph of a not-quite-standard type:

Lock Time

Here’s a little detail I was forced to re-learn yesterday; it’s one of those things where it’s easy to say “yes, obviously” AFTER you’ve had it explained so I’m going to start by posing it as a question. Here are two samples of PL/SQL that using locking to handle a simple synchronisation mechanism; one uses a table as an object that can be locked, the other uses Oracle’s dbms_lock package. I’ve posted the code for each fragment, and a sample of what you see in v$lock if two sessions execute the code one after the other:

Table locking – the second session to run this code will wait for the first session to commit or rollback:

Deferrable RI – 2

A question came up on Oracle-L recently about possible locking anomalies with deferrable referential integrity constraints.

Shrink Space

Here’s a lovely effect looking at v$lock (on 11.2.0.4)

Enqueue – PK, FK or Bitmap Index problem?


MP900302987If one is seeing waits for enq: TX – row lock contention  then there could be a lot of reasons. One distinguishing factor is the lock mode. If the lock mode is exclusive (mode 6) then it’s most likely a classic row lock where two sessions are trying to modify the same row. On the other hand if the lock mode is share (mode 4)  it’s typically going to be

v$lock

The problem of slow queries on v$lock just came up again on the OTN database forum, so I thought I’d better push out a post that’s been hanging around on my blog for the last few months. This is actually mentioned in MOS in note 1328789.1: “Query Against v$lock Run from OEM Performs Slowly” which points out that it is basically a problem of bad statistics and all you have to do is collect the stats.