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Indexing

Clustering_Factor

Here’s another little note on the clustering_factor for an index and the table preference table_cached_blocks that can be set with a call to dbms_stats.set_table_prefs(). I might be repeating a point that someone made in a comment on an older posting but if that’s the case I can’t find the comment at present, and it’s worth its own posting anyway.

Index Bouncy Scan 4

There’s always another hurdle to overcome. After I’d finished writing up the “index bouncy scan” as an efficient probing mechanism to find the combinations of the first two columns (both declared not null) of a very large index a follow-up question appeared almost immediately: “what if it’s a partitioned index”.

Min/Max upgrade

Here’s a nice little optimizer enhancement that appeared in 12.2 to make min/max range scans (and full scans) available in more circumstances. Rather than talk through it, here’s a little demonstration:

Upgrades

One of my maxims for Oracle performance is: “Don’t try to be too clever”. Apart from the obvious reason that no-one else may be able to understand how to modify your code if the requirements change at a future date, there’s always the possibility that an Oracle upgrade will mean some clever trick you implemented will simply stop working.

While searching for information about a possible Oracle bug recently I noticed the following fix control (v$system_fix_control) in 12.2.0.1:

Bitmap Join Indexes

I’ve been prompted by a recent question on the ODC database forum to revisit a note I wrote nearly five years ago about bitmap join indexes and their failure to help with join cardinalities. At the time I made a couple of unsupported claims and suggestions without supplying any justification or proof. Today’s article finally fills that gap.

Skip Scan 3

If you’ve come across any references to the “index skip scan” operation for execution plans you’ve probably got some idea that this can appear when the number of distinct values for the first column (or columns – since you can skip multiple columns) is small. If so, what do you make of this demonstration:

20 Indexes

If your system had to do a lot of distributed queries there’s a limit on indexes that might affect performance: when deriving an execution plan for a distributed query the optimizer will consider a maximum of twenty indexes on each remote table. if you have any tables with a ridiculous number of indexes (various 3rd party accounting and CRM systems spring to mind) and if you drop and recreate indexes on those tables in the wrong order then execution plans may change for the simple reason that the optimizer is considering a different subset of the available indexes.

FBIs don’t exist

This is a reprint (of a reprint) of a note I wrote more than 11 years ago on my old website. I’ve decided to republish it on the blog simply because one day I’ll probably decide to stop paying for the website given how old all the material is and this article makes an important point about the need (at least some of the time) for accuracy in the words you use to describe things.

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There’s no such thing as a function-based index.

Well, okay, that’s what the manuals call them but it would be so much better if they were called “indexes with virtual columns” – because that’s what they are and that’s a name that would eliminate confusion.

FBI Limitation

A recent question on the ODC (OTN) database forum prompted me to point out that the optimizer doesn’t consider function-based indexes on remote tables in distributed joins. I then spent 20 minutes trying to find the blog note where I had demonstrated this effect, or an entry in the manuals reporting the limitation – but I couldn’t find anything, so I’ve written a quick demo which I’ve run on 12.2.0.1 to show the effect. First, the SQL to create a couple of tables and a couple of indexes:

Conditional SQL – 5

Here’s a note that has been sitting around for more than 3 years (the draft date is Jan 2015), waiting for me to finish it off; and in that time we’ve got a new version of Oracle that changes the solution to the problem it presented. (I also managed to write “Conditional SQL –  6” in the intervening period !)

This posting started with a question on the OTN (now ODC) database forum about an execution plan used by 11.2.0.3.  Here’s a model to represent the data and the query: