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Oracle Index compression for range scan on file names

A new blog post on the Databases at CERN blog about tables storing long file names in a table, with full path, and index range scan on a prefixed pattern: https://db-blog.web.cern.ch/blog/franck-pachot/2018-11-oracle-index-compression-range-scan-file-names

COMPRESS ADVANCED LOW

The 12cR1 advanced index compression does not help here as all values are unique. Only partial prefix is redundant.

COMPRESS ADVANCED HIGH

The advanced algorithm ‘high’ introduced in 12cR2 can reduce better. But there’s no magic. Redundancy should be addressed at design. Full test:

Column And Table Redefinition With Minimal Locking

TLDR: Note to future self… (1) Read this before you modify a table on a live PostgreSQL database. If you do it wrong then your app might totally hang. There is a right way to do it which avoids that. (2) Especially remember the lock_timeout step. Many blog posts around the ‘net are missing this and it’s very important.

Recently I was chatting with some PostgreSQL users (who, BTW, were doing rather large-scale cool stuff in PG) and they asked a question about making schema changes with minimal impact to the running application. They were specifically curious about changing a primary key from INT to BIGINT.  (Oh, you are making all your new PK fields BIGINT right?)

Column And Table Redefinition With Minimal Locking

TLDR: Note to future self… (1) Read this before you modify a table on a live PostgreSQL database. If you do it wrong then your app might totally hang. There is a right way to do it which avoids that. (2) Especially remember the lock_timeout step. Many blog posts around the ‘net are missing this and it’s very important.

Recently I was chatting with some PostgreSQL users (who, BTW, were doing rather large-scale cool stuff in PG) and they asked a question about making schema changes with minimal impact to the running application. They were specifically curious about changing a primary key from INT to BIGINT.  (Oh, you are making all your new PK fields BIGINT right?)

Column And Table Redefinition With Minimal Locking

TLDR: Note to future self… (1) Read this before you modify a table on a live PostgreSQL database. If you do it wrong then your app might totally hang. There is a right way to do it which avoids that. (2) Especially remember the lock_timeout step. Many blog posts around the ‘net are missing this and it’s very important.

Recently I was chatting with some PostgreSQL users (who, BTW, were doing rather large-scale cool stuff in PG) and they asked a question about making schema changes with minimal impact to the running application. They were specifically curious about changing a primary key from INT to BIGINT.  (Oh, you are making all your new PK fields BIGINT right?)

Covering indexes in Oracle, and branch size

A covering index is an index that contains all the columns required by your query, so that you don’t have to do a TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID, which is the major cost of an index range scan. You don’t need any special feature to do that in Oracle. Just add the required columns at the end of the index. In the execution plan you will see the columns used as index keys for the range scan displayed in ‘access’ predicates, and the further filtering done on the remaining columns with ‘filter’ predicates. The ‘projection’ shows the columns that are returned in the rowset result.
However you may have seen that SQL Server has a special ‘INCLUDING’ keyword to separate those non-key columns added only for filtering or projection but not for access. What does it bring that Oracle doesn’t have?

Largest Tables Including Indexes and LOBs

Just a quick code snippit. I do a lot of data pumps to move schemas between different databases; for example taking a copy of a schema to an internal database to try to reproduce a problem. Some of these schemas have some very large tables. The large tables aren’t always needed to research a particular problem.

Here’s a quick bit of SQL to list the 20 largest tables by total size – including space used by indexes and LOBs. A quick search on google didn’t reveal anything similar so I just wrote something up myself. I’m pretty sure this is somewhat efficient; if there’s a better way to do it then let me know! I’m posting here so I can reference it in the future. :)

Largest Tables Including Indexes and LOBs

Just a quick code snippit. I do a lot of data pumps to move schemas between different databases; for example taking a copy of a schema to an internal database to try to reproduce a problem. Some of these schemas have some very large tables. The large tables aren’t always needed to research a particular problem.

Here’s a quick bit of SQL to list the 20 largest tables by total size – including space used by indexes and LOBs. A quick search on google didn’t reveal anything similar so I just wrote something up myself. I’m pretty sure this is somewhat efficient; if there’s a better way to do it then let me know! I’m posting here so I can reference it in the future. :)

Largest Tables Including Indexes and LOBs

Just a quick code snippit. I do a lot of data pumps to move schemas between different databases; for example taking a copy of a schema to an internal database to try to reproduce a problem. Some of these schemas have some very large tables. The large tables aren’t always needed to research a particular problem.

Here’s a quick bit of SQL to list the 20 largest tables by total size – including space used by indexes and LOBs. A quick search on google didn’t reveal anything similar so I just wrote something up myself. I’m pretty sure this is somewhat efficient; if there’s a better way to do it then let me know! I’m posting here so I can reference it in the future. :)

Dynamic Sampling And Indexes

There is a lot more to say about Dynamic Sampling and indexes, and I'll try to cover these basics in my Dynamic Sampling series on AllThingsOracle.com, but two recent discussions on the OTN forums and on Charles Hooper's blog prompted me to publish this blog post.

These discussions revolved around the following issues with Dynamic Sampling and indexes:

1. CREATE INDEX On Empty Table

n/a