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A new use for DML error logging

Many moons ago I did a short video on the DML error logging feature in Oracle. The feature has been around for many years now, and is a great tool for capturing errors during a large load without losing all of the rows that successfully loaded. You can watch that video below if you’re new to DML error logging.

But here is a possible new use case for DML error logging, even if you are not doing large scale loads. Let me describe the problem first, and then show how DML error logging might be a solution.

I’ll create a table with a constraint on it’s column

Getting locale warnings when logging on to Linux

This blogpost is about the reason and solving getting the following message, or messages alike these when logging i to a linux box using ssh:

-bash: warning: setlocale: LC_CTYPE: cannot change locale (UTF-8): No such file or directory

However, this is a warning. Please mind such an issue might be come up in another way, which can be more disrupting; at least in the past I had issues running perl for the same issue:

[root@dmcel01 ~]# /usr/local/bin/ipconf -verify
perl: warning: Setting locale failed.
perl: warning: Please check that your locale settings:
LANGUAGE = "en_US.UTF-8",
LC_ALL = "UTF-8",
LC_CTYPE = "UTF-8",
LANG = "en_US.UTF-8"
are supported and installed on your system.
perl: warning: Falling back to the standard locale ("C").

MERGE and ORA-30926

Just a quick blog post on MERGE and the “unable to get a stable set of rows” error that often bamboozles people. This is actually just the script output from a pre-existing YouTube video (see below) that I’ve already done on this topic, but I had a few requests for the SQL example end-to-end, so here it is.

Imagine the AskTOM team had a simple table defining the two core members, Chris Saxon and myself. But in the style of my true Aussie laziness, I was very slack about checking the quality of the data I inserted.

On Error Messages

Here’s a pet peeve of mine: Customers who don’t read the error messages. The usual symptom is a belief that there is just on error: “Doesn’t work”, and that all forms of “doesn’t work” are the same. So if you tried something, got an error, your changed something and you are still getting an error, nothing changed.

I hope everyone who reads this blog understand why this behavior makes any troubleshooting nearly impossible. So I won’t bother to explain why I find this so annoying and so self defeating. Instead, I’ll explain what can we, as developers, can do to improve the situation a bit. (OMG, did I just refer to myself as a developer? I do write code that is then used by customers, so I may as well take responsibility for it)

Here’s what I see as main reasons people don’t read error messages: