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Managing Oracle on Windows: Where’s my Oratab?

If you manage Oracle on Windows, you probably have wondered why it is so difficult to work out which Oracle instances are running and which ORACLE_HOMEs they use. On Unix or Linux, this is a very simple task.  Oracle services and their ORACLE_HOMEs are listed in the oratab file, located in /etc/ on most platforms and in /var/opt/oracle/ on Solaris.  To find what is running, we would usually use the ‘ps’ command and pipe it through grep to find and run PMON processes.

On Windows, it just isn’t this easy. Each Oracle instance runs in a single monolithic oracle.exe process. Nothing about the process indicates the name of the instance. When we want to find all of the configured Oracle services, we can use the ‘sc’ command, and pipe the results through find (I have added emphasis to the ASM and database instances):

How to Troubleshoot OEM 12c Cloud Control Auto-Discovery

I was recently involved in an upgrade project to go from 11.2.0.2 to 11.2.0.3 on an Exadata V2. We hit some snags during the upgrade specifically related to OEM 12c Cloud Control. We performed an out-of-place upgrade and OEM 12.1.0.1.0 had some difficulty in dealing with this.

12c Cloud Control is supposed to run a daily check that looks for new targets on each server. When it finds something new, it places this in a queue to wait for admin approval. With a single click, you can promote the newly discovered target to an OEM managed object.

Set Up Exadata for Cloud Control 12.1.0.2

I recently helped set up an Exadata X2-8 Database Machine with the latest version of OEM Cloud Countrol (12.1.0.2). A few documents do exist for this process – the most useful of which are the Exadata Discovery Cookbook and the Setup Automation Kit. However, I found a few inconsistencies and problems; I think the existing documents I found were written on older versions of OEM and older versions of the tools. Also, there are some additional steps for older Exadatas which didn’t apply to my case.

Quiet Release MySQL Plugin 12.1.0.1.2 — Bug Fixes

This is just a small bug-fix release of the plugin. It has actually been quietly released for a while now. If you have downloaded the plugin recently, you have the latest version. To be sure, check the version in the Console, or you can see it in the file name.

There are two bugs fixed:
1. Deployment on an OMS hosted on Solaris didn’t work. (And I suspect it could be the same for Agents on Solaris.)
2. Changing thresholds on the metrics caused the error “Modification of Target Monitoring Settings has Failed”. Also, applying monitoring template was failing for the same reason.

Adaptive Log File Sync: Oracle, Please Don’t Do That Again

Disclaimer: Much of what follows is pure speculation on my part. It could be completely wrong, and I’m putting it out there in the hopes that it’ll eventually be proven one way or the other.