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Plugzilla!

Cloning a pluggable database takes time, and for environments where you’d like to use clones as part of unit testing, or other elements of Agile development, it would be nice to be able to bring a clone into operation in the smallest time possible. One mechanism for that is sparse storage clones aka snapshot copy, but depending on your database version and your storage infrastructure, you might hit some limitations.

Enter …. Plugzilla! This PL/SQL package allows you clone pluggable databases extremely quickly by having pluggable database pre-cloned in advance.

Example

Lets say you have a development pluggable database called PDB1. You want to let developers take clones of this as quickly and as often as they like and at various stages in its life cycle. Here is how we might do it with plugzilla.

SMON_SCN_TIME and ORA-8161? Digging deeper

In the recent versions of the Oracle database, we’ve had the ability to convert between a System Change Number (SCN) and the approximate time to which that SCN pertains. These functions are unsurprisingly called SCN_TO_TIMESTAMP and TIMESTAMP_TO_SCN. The only potential misnomer here is that even though the functions are called “timestamp” and return a datatype of timestamp, on most platforms you are going to notice that the granularity doesn’t run down into fractions of seconds


SQL> select scn_to_timestamp(14816563713652) from dual;

SCN_TO_TIMESTAMP(14816563713652)
---------------------------------------------------------
08-JUN-19 02.30.59.000000000 AM

This all looks great until you start poking around too far into the past, and you end up in territory like this:

Hibernate for Oracle DBAs

Warning: any smart developer may feel sick when reading this ;)

I am not a developer, but I like to discuss with developers: share my side of the IT (the database that we want rock stable and durable) and listen to their side (the application that they want easy to maintain and evolve). And, as I like to understand what I’m talking about, I often need to test some snippets.

Many DBAs complain about Hibernate when they come upon the queries generated by a wrong mapping. They think it was designed to be bad (who would do that?). And they are convinced that JDBC and SQL are sufficient to build applications. Actually, many DBAs I have seen are persuaded that they understand everything about coding because they have written some ugly PERL scripts to automate their job. And that anything going beyond has the only goal to break the database.

DBMS_JOB – watching for failures

I had a friend point this one out to me recently. They use DBMS_JOB to allow some “fire and forget” style functionality for user, and in their case, the jobs are “best efforts” in that if they fail, it is not a big deal.

So whilst this may sound counter-intuitive, but if you rely on jobs submitted via DBMS_JOB to fail, then please read on.

By default, if a job fails 16 times in a row, it will marked as broken by the the database. Here’s a simple of example that, where the anonymous block will obviously fail because we are dividing by zero each time. I’ll set the job to run every 5 seconds, so that within a couple of minutes we’ll have 16 failures. First I’ll run this on 11.2.0.4

Partition loading in direct mode

Direct mode insert using the APPEND hint is a cool piece of technology that lets you load bulk data into a table very quickly and efficiently. Obviously there are a number of implications of doing so which you can read about here, but the one that catches most people out is the that you are locking the table during the load and once the load is completed, the table is “disabled” until the transaction ends. Here’s a quick example of that in action:

Raw partitions?

Here’s a quirky one for you. It can happen when you are dealing with a partitioned table where the partition key is defined as RAW. To be honest, I really can’t think of a reason why you ever want a table with a raw partition key. (If you have one, please let me know in the comments). Anyway, here’s the demo. I’ll start with a table using the cool automatic list partition facility and load a single row into it.

Grab all the DDL

I posted a video a couple of days ago showing a trigger mechanism to customize the capture of DDL that is issued on your database. The aim here is to be more generous with letting developers execute DDL on their Development databases, whilst still having a thorough record of the changes that are occurring. Of course, it goes without saying, which is why I am saying it </p />
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Application Express 19.1

AskTOM moved to Application Express 19.1 without any major issues last weekend. That in itself is a nice endorsement for APEX, given that the AskTOM application dates back nearly 20 years to 2001, and predates even the existence of APEX.

The only fix that we had to make was that AskTOM uses the static CDN files that Joel Kallman blogged about to make it nice and snappy wherever in the world it is used. The reference to those files have a hard-coded version number so that needed to updated. For AskTOM, we have a plugin that uses some jQuery elements that went pear-shaped when referencing the old version 18 files, but after a quick fix to that reference all was well.

Long running scheduler jobs

One of the nice things about the job scheduler in the Oracle database is the easily interpreted interval settings you can apply for job frequency. The days of cryptic strings like “sysdate+0.000694444” when all you really wanted to say was “Just run this job every minute” are a thing of the past. I covered how to get the database to convert interval strings into real execution dates here 

But it raises the question: What if I have a job that is scheduled to run every minute, but it takes more than 1 minute to run? Will the scheduler just crank out more and more concurrent executions of that job? Will I swamp my system with ever more background jobs? So I thought I’d find out with a simple test.

External table preprocessor on Windows

There are plenty of blog posts about using the pre-processor facility in external tables to get OS level information available from inside the database. Here’s a simple example of getting a directory listing: