Search

Top 60 Oracle Blogs

Recent comments

data guard

Oracle MAA reference architecture and HA, DR, RTO, RPO

By Franck Pachot

.
I may have mentioned in some previous blog post that, in my opinion, the names of Oracle Database features make sense on the vendor product management context more than in a user context. I’m not saying that it is good or bad. There are so many features, that can be combined, and that evolved for many years. The possible use cases is unlimited. What I see customers doing in Europe is very different from what I have seen in US companies or in Africa for example. What I’m saying is that most of the time you need a vendor-to-user dictionary when reading Oracle documentation and presentations. I’ll focus here on the MAA reference architecture. Yes, acronyms add to the complexity. MAA means Maximum Availability Architecture. Because when you have High Availability features for decades, you need another name when you bring an “higher” High Availability.

A Serverless Standby Database called Oracle Autonomous Data Guard

By Franck Pachot

.
Announced by Larry Ellison last week, here it is: the Autonomous Data Guard. You can try it, unfortunately not on the Free Tier.
First you create an Autonomous Database (ATP or ADW) and then you enable Autonomous Data Guard.

Some myths about PostgreSQL vs. Oracle

By Franck Pachot

.
I originally wrote this as a comment on the following post that you may find on internet:
https://www.2ndquadrant.com/en/blog/oracle-to-postgresql-reasons-to-migrate/
but my comment was not published (many links in it… I suppose it has been flagged as spam?) so I put it there.

You should never take any decision on what you read on the internet without verifying. It is totally valid to consider a move to Open Source databases, but doing it without good understanding is a risk for your migration project success.

Data Guard and RAC on Docker : Perhaps I was wrong?

I’ve talked a lot about Docker and containers over the last few years. With respect to the Oracle database on Docker, I’ve given my opinions in this article.

Over the weekend Sean Scott tweeted the following.

“A while back @oraclebase said Data Guard didn’t make sense on Docker.

Best Practices for Oracle Data Guard on Azure

I keep saying I’m going to start sharing what I’m doing in the Analytics space soon, but heck, there’s too much I need to keep adding to on the Oracle in Azure arena!

So, as most people know, I’m not a big fan of Oracle RAC, (Real Application Cluster).  My opinion was that it was often sold for use cases that it doesn’t serve, (such as HA) and the resource demands between the nodes, as well as what happens when a node is evicted to those that are left are not in the best interest for most use cases.  On the other hand, I LOVE Oracle Data Guard, active or standard, don’t matter, the product is great and it’s an awesome option for those migrating their Oracle databases to Azure VMs.

Using dbca to create a physical standby database

While investigating new options I discovered with dbca for the previous article I noticed that it’s now possible to use Oracle’s Database Creation Assistant (dbca) to create a physical standby database using the -createDuplicateDB flag.

I wanted to know how easily this can be done on my Oracle 18.5.0 system. I have 2 VMs, server3 and server4 running Oracle Linux 7.6. I created the primary database on server3. The database name is NCDB with the db_unique_name set to SITEA. I also use SITEA as the database SID to prevent confusion. My physical standby database with db_unique_name SITEB will reside on server4.

Account locking in an Active Data Guard environment

During the Data Guard round table of the excellent UKOUG Tech18 conference I got aware of this topic that I’d like to share with the Oracle community:

What is the locking behavior for user accounts in an environment where users may connect to the primary as well as to the standby database?

Enhanced “validate” commands in Oracle’s Data Guard Broker 18c

If you are using an Oracle Database Enterprise Edition chances are that there is at least one environment in your estate making use of Data Guard. And if you are using Data Guard, why not use the broker? I have been using Data Guard broker for a long time now, and it has definitely improved a lot over the first releases, back in the day. I like it so much these days that I feel hard done by if I can’t make use of it. This is of course a matter of personal preference, and I might be exaggerating a little :)

One of the nice additions to the broker in Oracle 12.1 was the ability to validate a database before a role change. This is documented in the Data Guard broker documentation. I certainly don’t solely rely on the output of the command, I have my own checks I’m running that go over and above what a validate can do.