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Video : Multitenant : Disk I/O (IOPS, MBPS) Resource Management for Pluggable Databases (PDBs)

In today’s video we’ll discuss how Resource Manager allows us to manage the disk I/O (IOPS, MBPS) usage in PDBs. This can be useful to stop a small number of PDBs using all disk IOPS and/or bandwidth on the server.

The video is based on the following article.

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Video : Multitenant : Memory Resource Management for Pluggable Databases (PDBs)

In today’s video we’ll discuss how Resource Manager allows us to manage the memory usage in PDBs. This can be useful to stop a small number of PDBs using all memory assigned to the instance.

This video was based on this article.

You might also find these useful.

Video : Multitenant : Dynamic CPU Scaling – Resource Manager Control of CPU using CPU_COUNT and CPU_MIN_COUNT

In today’s video we’ll discuss how Resource Manager can control CPU usage in PDBs using the CPU_COUNT and CPU_MIN_COUNT parameters. Oracle call this Dynamic CPU Scaling. This can be useful to stop a small number of PDBs using all CPU resources assigned to the instance.

This video is based on the following article.

Video : Instance Caging to Manage CPU Usage

In today’s video we’ll discuss instance caging to manage CPU usage. This can be useful when we are trying to consolidate multiple instances on a single server.

This video is based on the following article.

The star of today’s video is the beard belonging to Victor Torres. I feel totally inadequate with my patchy stubble… </p />
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Consolidation Planning

More and more companies are consolidating environments.  Server sprawl has a high cost to any business and finding ways to consolidate to more powerful servers or to the cloud is a productive undertaking for any company.

The Consolidation planner in Enterprise Manager has been around for quite some time, but many still don’t utilize this great feature.

Testing 12c CDB Resource Plans and a little bit about OEM Express

Inspired by Sue Lee’s presentation at Enkitec’s E4 conference I decided to re-run my test suite to work out how you can use Database and I/O Resource Manager in Oracle 12.1.0.2.2 to help consolidating databases in the new Multi-Tenant architecture. I should point out briefly that the use of Multi-Tenant as demonstrated in this article requires you to have a license. Tuning tools shown will also require you to be appropriately licensed…

Setup

Oracle database operating system memory allocation management for PGA – part 2: Oracle 11.2

This is the second part of a series of blogpost on Oracle database PGA usage. See the first part here. The first part described SGA and PGA usage, their distinction (SGA being static, PGA being variable), the problem (no limitation for PGA allocations outside of sort, hash and bitmap memory), a resolution for Oracle 12 (PGA_AGGREGATE_LIMIT), and some specifics about that (it doesn’t look like a very hard limit).

But this leaves out Oracle version 11.2. In reality, the vast majority of the database that I deal with at the time of writing is at version 11.2, and my guess is that this is not just the databases I deal with, but a general tendency. This could change in the coming time with the desupport of Oracle 11.2, however I suspect the installed base of Oracle version 12 to increase gradually and smoothly instead of in a big bang.

Oracle database operating system memory allocation management for PGA

This post is about memory management on the operating system level of an Oracle database. The first question that might pop in your head is: isn’t this a solved problem? The answer is: yes, if you use Oracle’s AMM (Automatic Memory Management) feature, which let’s you set a limit for the Oracle datababase’s two main memory area’s: SGA and PGA. But in my opinion any serious, real life, usage of an Oracle database on Linux will be (severely) constrained in performance because of the lack of huge pages with AMM, and I personally witnessed very strange behaviour and process deaths with the AMM feature and high demand for memory.

OSP #2c: Build a Standard Platform from the Bottom-Up

This is the fourth of twelve articles in a series called Operationally Scalable Practices. The first article gives an introduction and the second article contains a general overview. In short, this series suggests a comprehensive and cogent blueprint to best position organizations and DBAs for growth.

OSP #2c: Build a Standard Platform from the Bottom-Up

This is the fourth of twelve articles in a series called Operationally Scalable Practices. The first article gives an introduction and the second article contains a general overview. In short, this series suggests a comprehensive and cogent blueprint to best position organizations and DBAs for growth.