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Oracle Cloud : Free Tier and Article Updates

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Oracle Cloud Free Tier was announced a couple of months ago at Oracle OpenWorld 2019. It was mentioned in one of my posts at the time (here). So what do you get for your zero dollars?

Getting started with #Exasol on #AWS

It’s amazingly easy to run an Exasol Cluster on Amazon Web Services (AWS).

Subscribe Exasol in AWS marketplace

After having registered and having logged in to your AWS account, go to the AWS marketplace and search for Exasol:

Ode to Azure Cloud Shell on Christmas

When I arrived at Microsoft, I knew I would hopefully get to use my Linux skills for more than teaching SQL Server DBAs about Linux and was pleasantly surprised as I began working in Azure to find that, of course, it’s ALL LINUX.

After almost six months at the company and coming into the Christmas week, I’m thankful for all the technology I’m working with and what many assume that Microsoft won’t be about-  the command line.

Azure All the Time

As much as I feel GUIs are necessary, I’m happiest at the command line and recommend to all those I mentor to take the time to know how to perform any task from both the GUI as well as the CLI.  Since I practice what I preach, here I am six months in and have spent considerable time with all the features that you’ll find on the following page-

A Brief Look Inside Oracle's Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud

This post is part of a series that discusses some common issues in data warehouses.
There is lots of documentation for Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud (ADWC), in which I found this bold claim:

Bootstrapping a VM image in Oracle Cloud Infrastructure using cloud-init

At the time of writing Oracle’s Cloud Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) offers 2 ways to connect block storage to virtual machines: paravirtualised and via iSCSI. There are important differences between the two so please read the documentation to understand all the implications. I need all the performance I can get with my systems so I’m going with iSCSI.

Log in to Ubuntu VMs in Oracle Cloud Infrastructure

When I learned that Oracle was providing Ubuntu images in Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI) I was a bit surprised at first. After all, Oracle provides a great Enterprise Linux distribution in the form of Oracle Linux. As a Ubuntu fan I do of course appreciate the addition of Ubuntu to the list of supported distributions. In fact it doesn’t end there, have a look at the complete list of Oracle provided images to see what’s available.

Trying Ubuntu LTS

I wanted to give Ubuntu a spin on OCI and decided to start a small VM using the 16.04 LTS image. I have been using this release quite heavily in the past and have yet to make the transition to 18.04. Starting the 16.04 VM up was easily done using my terraform script. Immediately after the terraform prompt returned I faced a slight issue: I couldn’t log in:

Terraforming the Oracle Cloud: choosing and using an image family

For a few times now I have presented about “cloud deployments done the cloud way”, sharing lessons learned in the changing world I find myself in. It’s a lot of fun and so far I have been far too busy to blog about things I learned by trial and error. Working with Terraform turned out to be a very good source for blog posts, I’ll put a few of these up in the hope of saving you a few minutes.

This blog post is all about creating Ubuntu images in Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI) using terraform. The technique is equally applicable for other Linux image types though. In case you find this post later using a search engine, here is some version information that might put everything into context:

ATP vs ADW – the Autonomous Database lockdown profiles

By Franck Pachot

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The Oracle database has always distinguished two types of workloads: transactional (OLTP) and datawarehouse (VLDB, DWH, DSS, BI, analytics). There is the same idea in the managed Oracle Cloud with two autonomous database services.

To show how this is old, here is how they were defined in the Oracle7 Tuning Book:

CaptureOLTPvsDSS

The definition has not changed a lot. But the technology behind DSS/DWH has improved. Now, with In-Memory Column Store, Smart Scan, Result Cache we can even see that indexes, materialized views, star transformation, hints,.. are disabled in the Autonomous Datawarehouse cloud service.

Google Cloud Spanner – inserting data

By Franck Pachot

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In a previous post I’ve created a Google Cloud Spanner database and inserted a few rows from the GUI. This is definitely not a solution fo many rows and here is a post about using the command line.

If I start the Google Shell from the icon on the Spanner page for my project, everything is set. But if I run it from elsewhere, using the https://console.cloud.google.com/cloudshell as I did in A free persistent Google Cloud service with Oracle XE I have to set the project:

franck_pachot@cloudshell:~$ gcloud config set project superb-avatar-210409
Updated property [core/project].

Google Cloud Spanner – no decimal numeric data types

By Franck Pachot

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Google Cloud Spanner is a distributed relational database focused on scalability without compromising consistency and integrity. It is available only as a managed service in Google Cloud. Basically, the idea is to keep the scalability advantages of NoSQL database (like Bigtable) but adding transactions, relational tables, SQL, structured data,… as in the relational databases we love for decades.
The commercial pitch includes all the NoSQL buzzwords, with the addition of the legacy properties of SQL databases:
Cloud Spanner is a fully managed, mission-critical, relational database service that offers transactional consistency at global scale, schemas, SQL (ANSI 2011 with extensions), and automatic, synchronous replication for high availability.
Here I’m testing something that is not mentioned, but is taken for granted with all SQL databases: the ability to add numbers without erroneous arithmetic results.