Search

Top 60 Oracle Blogs

Recent comments

CBO

ANSI Plans

Here’s a thought that falls somewhere between philosophical and pragmatic. It came up while I was playing around with a problem from the Oracle database forum that was asking about options for rewriting a query with a certain type of predicate. This note isn’t really about that question but the OP supplied a convenient script to demonstrate their requirement and I’ve hi-jacked most of the code for my own purposes so that I can ask the question:

Should the presence of an intermediate view name generated by the optimizer in the course of cost-based query transformation cause two plans, which are otherwise identical and do exactly the same thing, to have different plan hash values ?

To demonstrate the issue let’s start with a simple script to create some data and generate an execution plan.

CBO Oddities – 1

I’ve decided to do a little rewriting and collating so that I can catalogue related ideas in an order that makes for a better narrative. So this is the first in a series of notes designed to help you understand why the optimizer has made a particular choice and why that choice is (from your perspective) a bad one, and what you can do either to help the optimizer find a better plan, or subvert the optimizer and force a better plan.

If you’re wondering why I choose to differentiate between “help the optimizer” and “subvert the optimizer” consider the following examples.

opt_estimate catalogue

This is just a list of the notes I’ve written about the opt_estimate() hint.

Troubleshooting

A recent thread on the Oracle Developer Community starts with the statement that a query is taking a very long time (with the question “how do I make it go faster?” implied rather than asked). It’s 12.1.0.2 (not that that’s particularly relevant to this blog note), and we have been given a number that quantifies “very long time” (again not particularly relevant to this blog note – but worth mentioning because your “slow” might be my “wow! that was fast” and far too many people use qualitative adjectives when the important detail is quantative). The query had already been running for 15 hours – and here it is:

Optimizer Tricks 1

I’ve got a number of examples of clever little tricks the optimizer can do to transform your SQL before starting in on the arithmetic of optimisation. I was prompted to publish this one by a recent thread on ODC. It’s worth taking note of these tricks when you spot one as a background knowledge of what’s possible makes it much easier to interpret and trouble-shoot from execution plans. I’ve labelled this one “#1” since I may publish a few more examples in the future, and then I’ll have to catalogue them – but I’m not making any promises about that.

Here’s a table definition, and a query that’s hinted to use an index on that table.

gather_system_stats

What happens when you execute dbms_stats.gather_system_stats() with the ‘Exadata’ option ?

Here’s what my system stats look like (12.2.0.1 test results) after doing so. (The code to generate the two different versions is at the end of the note).

opt_estimate 5

If you’ve been wondering why I resurrected my drafts on the opt_estimate() hint, a few weeks ago I received an email containing an example of a query where a couple of opt_estimate() hints were simply not working. The critical features of the example was that the basic structure of the query was of a type that I had not previously examined. That’s actually a common type of problem when trying to investigate any Oracle feature from cold – you can spend days thinking about all the possible scenarios you should model then the first time you need to do apply your knowledge to a production system the requirement falls outside every model you’ve examined.

Before you go any further reading this note, though, I should warn you that it ends in frustration because I didn’t find a solution to the problem I wanted to fix – possibly because there just isn’t a solution, possibly because I didn’t look hard enough.

opt_estimate 4

In the previous article in this series on the opt_estimate() hint I mentioned the “query_block” option for the hint. If you can identify a specify query block that becomes an “outline_leaf” in an execution plan (perhaps because you’ve deliberately given an query block name to an inline subquery and applied the no_merge() hint to it) then you can use the opt_estimate() hint to tell the optimizer how many rows will be produced by that query block (each time it starts). The syntax of the hint is very simple:

opt_estimate 3

This is just a quick note to throw out a couple of of the lesser-known options for the opt_estimate() hint – and they may be variants that are likely to be most useful since they address a problem where the optimizer can produce consistently bad cardinality estimates. The first is the “group by” option – a hint that I once would have called a “strategic” hint but which more properly ought to be called a “query block” hint. Here’s the simplest possible example (tested under 12.2, 18.3 and 19.2):

opt_estimate 2

This is a note that was supposed to be a follow-up to an initial example of using the opt_estimate() hint to manipulate the optimizer’s statistical understanding of how much data it would access and (implicitly) how much difference that would make to the resource usage. Instead, two years later, here’s part two – on using opt_estimate() with nested loop joins. As usual I’ll start with a little data set: