breakpoint

Watching is in the eye of the beholder

Recently I was investigating the inner working of Oracle. One of the things that is fundamental to the Oracle database is the SCN (system change number). SCNs are used to synchronise changes in the database. There is one source for SCNs in every instance (kcbgscn; the global or current SCN in the fixed SGA), and there are multiple tasks for which Oracle keeps track of synchronisation using SCNs. A few of these tasks for which Oracle stores and uses SCNs to keep track of progress are on disk SCN and lwn SCN.

This blogpost is about some oddities I found when using gdb (the GNU debugger) to watch memory locations of a running Oracle database. This should not be done on a production instance, and is purely for research purposes. Only use the methods mentioned in this article if you are absolutely sure what you are doing, and/or if you are using an Oracle instance that can be crashed and can be restored.