Search

Top 60 Oracle Blogs

Recent comments

Azure CLI

Dynamic Values in Linux Scripting

I do a LOT of scripting. Given the choice to click in a GUI vs. typing at the command line, I’ll choose the command line. Given the choice to type commands in repeatedly vs. scripting out a task I perform more than twice, I’ll script. Scripting effectively is an art as much as it’s a science.

My idea of science

Where a GUI can change, both in content, as well as layout, a script is less impacted by this when it is designed to dynamically work with the catalog. You have the choice to either work with the values in an array or to just pull it into a temporary file to work with as part of the script. For the example, I’ll stick with the latter to make our example easier to reproduce.

No Pause on the Azure Data Factory

Using only what you need in Azure is a crucial part of optimizing your environment in the cloud. You find that as attractive as Azure is for the masses, making this change to make sure what you do use is optimal will make it downright irresistible.

Many customers, as they are ramping up with Azure Data Factory, (ADF) didn’t worry too much as they built out pipelines, as they could always pause the service at the resource level.

In recent weeks this feature has been deprecated and customers may be at a loss as to how to proceed. The best part about technology is that there’s always another way to accomplish something, you just need to figure out how to do it. Lucky for us, the Azure team wouldn’t have removed an option without another way to perform the task and in fact, introduced an enhanced way to do this.

Azure Automation of A-to-Z, Part I

DevOps deployments and automation have numerous tools at their disposal, but most often, scripting is required. Although I’m a Microsoft Azure fanatic, I am also a strong advocate of Linux and with my two decades on Unix, I strongly prefer BASH over PoSH. I find the maturity of BASH and KSH highly attractive over PoSH and with my experience, I’m simply more skilled with shells native to the Linux OS.

Ode to Azure Cloud Shell on Christmas

When I arrived at Microsoft, I knew I would hopefully get to use my Linux skills for more than teaching SQL Server DBAs about Linux and was pleasantly surprised as I began working in Azure to find that, of course, it’s ALL LINUX.

After almost six months at the company and coming into the Christmas week, I’m thankful for all the technology I’m working with and what many assume that Microsoft won’t be about-  the command line.

Azure All the Time

As much as I feel GUIs are necessary, I’m happiest at the command line and recommend to all those I mentor to take the time to know how to perform any task from both the GUI as well as the CLI.  Since I practice what I preach, here I am six months in and have spent considerable time with all the features that you’ll find on the following page-

Use Azure CLI…I Beg You…

#333333; cursor: text; font-family: -apple-system,BlinkMacSystemFont,'Segoe UI',Roboto,Oxygen-Sans,Ubuntu,Cantarell,'Helvetica Neue',sans-serif; font-size: 16px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px;">Azure CLI made me feel right at home after working at Oracle in the Enterprise Manager CLI, (EMCLI)  The syntax is simple, powerful and allows an interface to manage Azure infrastructure from the command line, scripting out complex processing that would involve a lot of time in the user interface.