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February 2020

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Previous & next blog: follow the link…

I’ve blogged on Medium for about one year. Now that I’m back at dbi services and I’ll continue to blog there. Here is the RSS feed:

Databases are slow right?

Man, it gets my goat when people start pontificating nonsense on Twitter.

Yeah, I know, I know, I shouldn’t get upset, because 99% of everything on social media is nonsense anyway, but it is when people roll out claims about database tech that I tend to get tetchy Smile

Today it’s that familiar old chestnut: “Constraints in the database make it slow“. And…this one even came with some numbers add some apparent weight!

Following Various Legal Action Regarding “Oracle Cloud Revenue”

As a courtesy, I would like to provide a copy of the latest legal document filed in an action being brought against Oracle leadership resulting from alleged, um,  improprieties in revenue reporting over the last few years. There is nothing sacred about this document. Google can find it for you just as easily.

Click on the following link to download the PDF: click here.

From the table of contents:

SchedLat: a Low Tech Script for Measuring Process CPU Scheduling Latency on Linux

As you may know, I like to use low tech scripts when possible, ideally such ones that don’t even require you to be root. I prefer simple and “boring” tools as a starting point simply because of the production reality at my customers in traditional enterprise IT. Systems where RHEL6 (and clones) seem to be the most common distros (with Linux kernel 2.6.32) and it’s not too unusual to see RHEL5 occasionally either.

SchedLat: a Low Tech Script for Measuring Process CPU Scheduling Latency on Linux

As you may know, I like to use low tech scripts when possible, ideally such ones that don’t even require you to be root. I prefer simple and “boring” tools as a starting point simply because of the production reality at my customers in traditional enterprise IT. Systems where RHEL6 (and clones) seem to be the most common distros (with Linux kernel 2.6.32) and it’s not too unusual to see RHEL5 occasionally either.

Shadow IT : Low-code solutions can help!

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I recently had a bit of a rant on email about the current state of Shadow IT at work. Typically, we don’t know it is happening until something goes wrong, then we’re called in to help and can’t, mostly because we don’t have the resources to do it. My rant went something like this…

“This is shadow IT.

Shadow IT is happening because we are not able to cope with the requirements from the business, so they do it themselves.

18c versus 19c

I had someone say to me at an event recently: “We’re are going to upgrade to 18c, because 19c is new and is probably less stable”.

Let me sum up that sentiment simply: It’s Wrong Smile

Now, don’t get me wrong. I am not claiming that every Oracle release is perfect, contains zero bugs, never has a regression, will mow your lawn, take your kids to school, clean your house and sort out all the climate change issues in the world.

New Parallel Distribution Method For Direct Path Loads

Starting with version 12c Oracle obviously has introduced another parallel distribution method for direct path loads (applicable to INSERT APPEND and CTAS operations) when dealing with partitioned objects.

As you might already know, starting with version 11.2 Oracle supported a new variation of the PQ_DISTRIBUTE hint allowing more control how data gets distributed for the actual DML load step. In addition to the already documented methods (NONE, RANDOM / RANDOM_LOCAL, PARTITION) there is a new one EQUIPART which obviously only applies to scenarios where both, source and target table are equi partitioned.

count(*) – again

I’ve just received an email asking (yet again) a question about counting the number of rows in a table.

We have a large table with a CLOB column, where the CLOB occupies 85% storage space.
when we use select count(*) from , the DBA says that you should not use count(*) as it uses all columns and as this table contains CLOB it results in high CPU usage, where as if we use count(rowid), this brings us faster and same result.

The Goal and The DevOps Handbook (again) : My Reviews

The Goal


In my recent review of The Unicorn Project I mentioned several times how much I loved the The Phoenix Project.