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December 2019

Video : Oracle REST Data Services (ORDS) : RESTful Web Services Handling Media Files

In today’s video we take a look at RESTful web services handling media files built using Oracle REST Data Services (ORDS).

This is based on this article.

There is more information about related stuff here.

New Theme: Twenty Twenty

We’re pleased to announce that Twenty Twenty — the new WordPress default theme designed by Anders Norén— is available to all WordPress.com sites.

Twenty Twenty was designed with the flexibility of the new WordPress Editor at its core. If you want to use it for an organization or a business, you can combine columns, groups, and media to create dynamic layouts that show off your services or products. If you want to use it for a traditional blog, the centered content column and considered typography makes it perfect for that as well.

2019-what grabbed your attention

Here are the blog posts that you hit on most this year, with the most viewed entry on top. Unsurprisingly is it related to my bugbear with the OpenWorld catalog. I mean, every conference organizer must know that the one thing the attendees will always want is to get access to all of the content. Questions on UTL_FILE often come up on AskTOM, so it is unsurprising to see UTL_FILE pop up on the list.

Tips’n’tricks: understanding “too many authentication failures” in SSH

Virtualbox VMs powered by Vagrant require authentication via SSH keys so you don’t have to provide a password each time vagrant up is doing its magic. Provisioning tools you run as part of the vagrant up command also rely on the SSH key based authentication to work properly. This is documented in the official Vagrant documentation set.

I don’t want to use unknown SSH keys with my own Vagrant boxes as a matter of principle. Whenever I create a new custom box I resort to a dedicated SSH key I’m using just for this purpose. This avoids the trouble with Vagrant’s “insecure key pair”, all I need to do is add config.ssh.private_key_path = "/path/to/key" to the Vagrantfile.

What are you really measuring?

File this under the “Lies, damn lies and statistics” section.

As I walked into the office the other day I looked at a monitor used to display various bits of news and information. One of the things it displayed was the number of service desk calls over the last period. I’m sure my reaction was meant to be, “Wow, the service desk are smashing it by answering all those questions!”, but my actual reaction was, “Wow, our services suck!”

Oracle Database 19c Automatic Indexing: Index Compression (Ghosteen)

    In my previous post on Automatic Indexing, I discussed how the default index column order (in absence of other factors) is column id, the order in which the columns are defined in the table. In this post, I’ll explore if this changes if index compression is also implemented. By default, Automatic Indexing does […]

Importing geo-partitioned data… the easy way

 

setting the stage

I started at Cockroach labs back in June 2019 to help others learn how to architect and develop applications using a geo-distributed database.  There has been a resurgence in distributed database technology, but the focus on geo-distributed is quite unique to CockroachDB.  While the underlying technology is unique, developers and DBAs that come with a wealth of experience, need to know how to best use this innovative technology.  Given this situation, I thought it would be good to start a blog series to explore various topics facing anyone beginning to architect database solutions with CockroachDB.

To start using a database, the first step is to IMPORT table data so you can begin to see how the database performs and responds.  And thus the IMPORT series has started!

kglLock()+1406<-kglget()+293<-qostobkglcrt1()+498<-qostobkglcrt()+248<-qostobkglcrt2()+412<-qospsis(…

kglLock()+1406<-kglget()+293<-qostobkglcrt1()+498<-qostobkglcrt()+248<-qostobkglcrt2()+412<-qospsis()+2511 <-qospPostProcessIStats()+2765<-qerltFetch()+1544<-qerstFetch()+449<-insdlexe()+364<-insExecStmtExecIniEngine()+1810<-insexe()+2283<-atbugi_update_global_indexes()+1656<-atbFMdrop()+3088<-atbdrv()+7719

Sorry for this title, but that’s exactly the subject: this short stack gives me enough information to understand the issue, reproduce it, open a SR, talk with friends, find a workaround,…

A Friday afternoon story

Here is how this started, on a database just migrated from 11g:

kglLock()+1406<-kglget()+293<-qostobkglcrt1()+498<-qostobkglcrt()+248<-qostobkglcrt2()+412<-qospsis(…

kglLock()+1406<-kglget()+293<-qostobkglcrt1()+498<-qostobkglcrt()+248<-qostobkglcrt2()+412<-qospsis()+2511 <-qospPostProcessIStats()+2765<-qerltFetch()+1544<-qerstFetch()+449<-insdlexe()+364<-insExecStmtExecIniEngine()+1810<-insexe()+2283<-atbugi_update_global_indexes()+1656<-atbFMdrop()+3088<-atbdrv()+7719

Sorry for this title, but that’s exactly the subject: this short stack gives me enough information to understand the issue, reproduce it, open a SR, talk with friends, find a workaround,…

A Friday afternoon story

Here is how this started, on a database just migrated from 11g:

Installing Oracle 19c on Linux

I needed to create a new 19c install yesterday for a test of some customer software and whilst I love Oracle products I have to say that installing the software and database has never been issue free and simple over....[Read More]

Posted by Pete On 06/12/19 At 04:27 PM