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October 2019

Cursor_sharing

Here’s a funny little detail that I don’t think I’ve noticed before – needing only a simple demo script:

First steps with Hashicorp Vault and Ansible

This post is about using using hashicorp vault and ansible.

Everyone that has used ansible knows you sometimes can’t get around storing secrets (passwords mostly) in an ansible playbook because for example an installer requires them. Or even simpler, because authentication must be done via a username and password.

The ansible embedded solution is to use ansible vault. To me, ansible vault is a solution to the problem of storing plain secrets in an ansible playbook by obfuscating them. However, these secrets are static, and still require the actual decryption key on runtime. In a lot of cases, it is delivered by putting the password in a file.

My SID

Here’s a little note that’s been hanging around as a draft for more than eight years according to the OTN (as it was) posting that prompted me to start writing it. At the time there were still plenty of people using Oracle 10g. so the question didn’t seem entirely inappropriate:

On 10g R2 when I open a sqlplus session how can I know my session SID ? I’m not DBA then can not open as sysdba and query v$session.

What’s new with Oracle database 19.4 versus 19.3

The most notable thing here is an “official” (non-underscore) parameter has been introduced with 19.4, “ignore_session_set_param_errors”. The description is: ‘Ignore errors during alter session param set’. I did a quick check to see if I could set it to true or false, which I couldn’t (resulted in an error).

With the Oracle database version 19.3 patched to 19.4 on linux, the following things have changed:

What Privileges Can you Grant On PL/SQL?

Oracle has a lot of privileges and models; privileges can be granted to users, roles and also since 12c roles can be granted to PL/SQL code (I will not discuss this aspect here as i will bog separately about grants....[Read More]

Posted by Pete On 08/10/19 At 01:43 PM

orachk can now warn about unwanted cleanup of files in /var/tmp/.oracle

Some time ago @martinberx mentioned on twitter that one of his Linux systems suffered from Clusterware issues for which there wasn’t a readily available explanation. It turned out that the problem he faced were unwanted (from an Oracle perspective at least) automatic cleanup operations in /var/tmp/.oracle. You can read more at the original blog post.

The short version is this: systemd (1) – successor to SysV init and Upstart – tries to be helpful removing unused files in a number of “temp” directories. However some of the files it can remove are essential for Clusterware, and without them all sorts of trouble ensue.

What’s new with Oracle database 18.7 versus 18.6

With the Oracle database version 18.6 patched to 18.7 on linux, the following things have changed:

I Wish All New Presenters Knew This (and it will help you):

All people new to presenting need to know this:

Resumable

There are two questions about temporary space that appear fairly regularly on the various Oracle forums. One is of the form:

From time to time my temporary tablespace grows enormously (and has to be shrunk), how do I find what’s making this happen?

The other follows the more basic pattern:

My process sometimes crashes with Oracle error: “ORA-01652: unable to extend temp segment by %n in tablespace %s” how do I stop this happening?

Before moving on to the topic of the blog, it’s worth pointing out two things about the second question:

Video : Oracle REST Data Services (ORDS) : AutoREST

Today’s video is a demonstration of the AutoREST feature of Oracle REST Data Services (ORDS).

This is based on the following article.

I also have a bunch of other articles here.

The star of today’s video is Connor McDonald of “600 slides in 45 minutes” fame, and more recently AskTom

Cheers