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March 2019

What Caused This Wait Event: Using Oracle's wait_event[] tracing

I talked about a new diagnostic event wait_event[] back at OakTableWorld 2014. Oracle introduced this feature in version 12.1. But since there’s only a camera recorded video of that talk, I’ll document some examples here.
Attaching Actions to Wait Events The new wait_event[] event name allows you to attach actions, like tracing, to wait events. The action runs whenever a wait event ends. It behaves like Oracle’s SQL Trace that writes out trace lines for wait events only when the wait ends.

What Caused This Wait Event: Using Oracle's wait_event[] tracing

I talked about a new diagnostic event wait_event[] back at OakTableWorld 2014. Oracle introduced this feature in version 12.1. But since there’s only a camera recorded video of that talk, I’ll document some examples here.
Attaching Actions to Wait Events The new wait_event[] event name allows you to attach actions, like tracing, to wait events. The action runs whenever a wait event ends. It behaves like Oracle’s SQL Trace that writes out trace lines for wait events only when the wait ends.

What Caused This Wait Event: Using Oracle's wait_event[] tracing

I talked about a new diagnostic event wait_event[] back at OakTableWorld 2014. Oracle introduced this feature in version 12.1. But since there’s only a camera recorded video of that talk, I’ll document some examples here.
Attaching Actions to Wait Events The new wait_event[] event name allows you to attach actions, like tracing, to wait events. The action runs whenever a wait event ends. It behaves like Oracle’s SQL Trace that writes out trace lines for wait events only when the wait ends.

What Caused This Wait Event: Using Oracle's wait_event[] tracing

I talked about a new diagnostic event wait_event[] back at OakTableWorld 2014. Oracle introduced this feature in version 12.1. But since there’s only a camera recorded video of that talk, I’ll document some examples here.
Attaching Actions to Wait Events The new wait_event[] event name allows you to attach actions, like tracing, to wait events. The action runs whenever a wait event ends. It behaves like Oracle’s SQL Trace that writes out trace lines for wait events only when the wait ends.

Amazon RDS cluster dashboard with Performance Insights

Amazon RDS Performance Insights (PI) doesn’t have a single pane of glass dashboard for clusters, yet. Currently PI has a dashboard that has to be looked at for each instance in a cluster.

On the other hand one can create a simple cluster dashboard using Cloudwatch.

PI, when enabled, automatically sends three metrics to Cloudwatch every minute.

These metrics are

  1. DBLoad
  2. DBLoadCPU
  3. DBLoadNonCPU

DBLoad = DBLoadCPU + DBLoadNonCPU

Oracle RAC vs. SQL Server AG

As I have seen the benefit for having a post on Oracle database vs. SQL Server architecture, let’s move onto the next frontier- High Availability…or what people think is high availability architecture in the two platforms.

To RAC or Not to RAC

There is a constant rumble among Oracle DBAs- either all-in for Oracle Real Application Cluster, (RAC) or a desire to use it for the tool it was technically intended for. Oracle RAC can be very enticing- complex and feature rich, its the standard for engineered systems, such as Oracle Exadata and even the Oracle Data Appliance, (ODA). Newer implementation features, such as Oracle RAC One-Node offered even greater flexibility in the design of Oracle environments, but we need to also discuss what it isn’t- Oracle RAC is not a Disaster Recovery solution.

Determined on Determinism

I’m feeling very determined on this one. Yes I have a lot of determination to inform blog readers about determinism, and yes I have run out of words that sound like DETERMINISTIC. But one of the most common misconceptions I see for PL/SQL functions is that developers treat them as if they were “extending” the existing database kernel. By this I mean that developers often assume that wherever an existing in-built function (for example TO_NUMBER or SUBSTR etc) could be used, then a PL/SQL function of their own creation will work in the exactly the same way.

Often that will be the case, but the most common scenario I see tripping up people is using PL/SQL functions within SQL statements. Consider the following simple example, where a PL/SQL function is utilizing the in-built SYSTIMESTAMP and TO_CHAR functions.

PostgresConf 2019 Summary

https://ardentperf.files.wordpress.com/2019/03/pgconf-2.jpg?w=600 600w, https://ardentperf

PostgresConf 2019 Summary

https://ardentperf.files.wordpress.com/2019/03/pgconf-2.jpg?w=600 600w, https://ardentperf

PostgresConf 2019 Summary

https://ardentperf.files.wordpress.com/2019/03/pgconf-2.jpg?w=600 600w, https://ardentperf