Search

Top 60 Oracle Blogs

Recent comments

October 2018

“Hidden” Efficiencies of Non-Partitioned Indexes on Partitioned Tables Part II (Aladdin Sane)

In Part I of this series, I highlighted how a Non-Partitioned Global Index on a Partitioned Table is able to effectively perform “Partition Pruning” by reading only the associated index entries to access just the table blocks of interest from relevant table partitions when the table partitioned keys are specified in an SQL Predicate. Understanding […]

Random Upgrade

Here’s a problem that (probably) won’t affect the day to day running of most systems – but it could be a pain in the backside for people who write programs to generate repeatable test data. I’m not going to say much about the problem, just leave you with a test script.

Log file switch (checkpoint incomplete) wait events and LGWR waiting for checkpoint progress

I was recently involved in troubleshooting an interesting performance issue with some non-intuitive background process & wait event behavior. I reproduced the problem in my own custom-tailored environment (Oracle 18.3 on Linux), here's the starting point:
After starting a transaction-heavy benchmark, soon after the transaction rate drops and the database sessions are mostly waiting for some Configuration wait class events, instead of getting work done.
Just looking into the high level wait class names is not enough, so let's drill down with ashtop.

Log file switch (checkpoint incomplete) wait events and LGWR waiting for checkpoint progress

I was recently involved in troubleshooting an interesting performance issue with some non-intuitive background process & wait event behavior. I reproduced the problem in my own custom-tailored environment (Oracle 18.3 on Linux), here's the starting point:
After starting a transaction-heavy benchmark, soon after the transaction rate drops and the database sessions are mostly waiting for some Configuration wait class events, instead of getting work done.
Just looking into the high level wait class names is not enough, so let's drill down with ashtop.

Use Azure CLI…I Beg You…

#333333; cursor: text; font-family: -apple-system,BlinkMacSystemFont,'Segoe UI',Roboto,Oxygen-Sans,Ubuntu,Cantarell,'Helvetica Neue',sans-serif; font-size: 16px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px;">Azure CLI made me feel right at home after working at Oracle in the Enterprise Manager CLI, (EMCLI)  The syntax is simple, powerful and allows an interface to manage Azure infrastructure from the command line, scripting out complex processing that would involve a lot of time in the user interface.
 

	

Join Cardinality – 2

In the previous note I posted about Join Cardinality I described a method for calculating the figure that the optimizer would give for the special case where you had a query that:

Partial Indexes–Take Care With Truncate

Partial indexes are a very cool feature that came along with Oracle 12c. The capability at partition level to control index existence allows for a couple of obvious use cases:

1) You index the data in recent partitions only, because small amounts of data are aggressively searched by applications and/or users, but not the older data because the queries for older data are either less frequent or are more analytical in nature.

Using Microsoft Flows to Automate RSS Feeds

Now everyone knows how I like to automate everything and for those that have known me since I started sharing content, I pretty much cried a thousand tears when the personalized news source, Prism disappeared.

I’ve been working with RSS feeds aggregators to send me content each day to read, but I get frustrated with having to go find them sent to my spam folder or not being able to get to the links, so I wanted to try something new.

ODBV3 and ASM

At Trivadis Performance Days 2018 (awesome event by the way) I promised to deliver ODBV3 with support for ASM – and here it is! </p />
</p></div>

    	  	<div class=

Understanding Distribution in #Exasol

Exasol doesn’t need much administration but getting distribution right matters

Exasol uses a clustered shared-nothing architecture with many sophisticated internal mechanisms to deliver outstanding performance without requiring much administration. Getting the distribution of rows between cluster nodes right is one of the few critical tasks left, though. To explain this, let’s say we have two tables t1 and t2: