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April 2018

Speaking At DOAG 2018 Exa & Middleware Days In Frankfurt

I will be speaking at the DOAG 2018 Exa & Middleware Days in Frankfurt on June 18th and 19th. My talk will be "Exadata & InMemory Real World Performance" where I discuss the different performance improvements you can expect from the super fast scans delivered by those technologies depending on the actual work profile of the SQL and data used.

Hope to see you there!

SQL Monitor

I’ve mentioned the SQL Monitor report from time to time as a very useful way of reviewing execution plans – the feature is automatically enabled by parallel execution and by queries that are expected to take more than a few seconds to complete, and the inherent overheads of monitoring are less than the impact of enabling the rowsource execution statistics that allow you to use the ‘allstats’ format of dbms_xplan.display_cursor() to get detailed execution information for a query. The drawback to the SQL Monitor feature is that it doesn’t report predicate information.

How-to generate random finance data

This time I demo how you can generate random financial data, to create test data for financial or commerce applications.

How-to generate random finance data

This time I demo how you can generate random financial data, to create test data for financial or commerce applications.

Question: Anything Wrong With Query Performance? (Straight To You)

I have a query that runs pretty darn efficiently, here’s the setup: So the query basically returns 1000 rows based on the CODE column and it does so using an index on CODE. The CBO has got the costings for this just about spot on. For 1000 rows returned, it does so with just 1006 […]

Lady Coders Conference, Denver 2017

This weekend I’m not going to have to say, “No, this is not my husband’s code” for a change.

Whitepaper Announcement: Migrating Oracle Database Workloads to Oracle Linux on AWS

This is just a quick blog entry to share a good paper on migrating Oracle Database workloads to Amazon Web Services EC2 instances running Oracle Linux.

Please click the following link for a copy of the paper:  Click Here.

 

A look into oracle redo, part 9: commit

The previous blogpost talked about a simple insert, this blogpost investigates what happens when the DML is committed. Of course this is done with regular commit settings, which means means they are not touched, which means commit_logging is set to immediate and commit_wait is set to wait as far as I know. The documentation says there is no default value, and the settings are empty in all parameter views. In my humble opinion, if you must change the commit settings in order to make your application perform usable with the database, something is severely wrong somewhere.

This blogpost works best if you thoroughly gone through the previous post. I admit it’s a bit dry and theoretical, but you will appreciate the knowledge which you gained there, because it directly applies to a commit.

First let’s look at the flow of functions for the commit:

How to generate random names, birth dates and more

Quick demo video showing how to generate random data related to persons, such as names (first, middle and last names), birth dates, job titles and more.

How to generate random names, birth dates and more

Quick demo video showing how to generate random data related to persons, such as names (first, middle and last names), birth dates, job titles and more.