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March 2018

I’m Proud to now be President Elect of the UK Oracle User Group

At the start of this week, voting for the 2 new UKOUG board members was closed and the votes were counted. Tuesday Morning, I received a call from Carl Dudley, the chair of their appointments committee, and was informed there had been more “Yes” votes than “No” votes for me – So I am now President Elect of the UK Oracle User Group!

It was a relief to know I’d received the approval of the majority of people who had voted for the new president – I was pretty certain that I’d win, given how many words of support I had received, but there is always that doubt… I was curious as to how close the vote was, but Carl was very professional and would give me no clues.

I’d like to thank everyone who voted for me, and also all the people with the Oracle community who showed support on social media for me. I should also mention that my wife, Sue, did not just say “oh go on, if you must” but encouraged me to put my hat in the ring.

TKPROF’s Argument PDBTRACE

If you run TKPROF without arguments, you get a complete list of its arguments with a short description for each of them (here the output generated by version 18.1.0):

Trip down memory lane

I did a little video for St Patricks day, but it also brought back memories of my first computer experiences.  A Sinclair ZX80, a Commodore 64, and many other machines that I thought were so cool for their time.

Feel free to share your experiences in comments.

Announcement: Europe June 2018 Dates – Oracle Indexing Internals Seminar

I’m very excited to announce some European June 2018 dates for my popular “Oracle Indexing Internals and Best Practices” seminar. This is a must attend seminar of benefit to not only DBAs, but also to Developers, Solution Architects and anyone else interested in designing, developing or maintaining high performance Oracle-based applications. It’s a fun, but […]

Resetting High Water Marks on On-line Temporary Table Instances

PeopleSoft has always used regular database tables for temporary working storage in batch processes.   Up to PeopleTools 7.x working storage tables were shared by all instances of a program.  That led to consistent read contention when multiple processes concurrently used the same table, and much higher high water marks that increased durations of full scans.
From PeopleTools 8, many copies of each temporary working storage table are created.  Application Engines that run on the Process Scheduler are allocated exclusive use of a particular copy of the table.  This avoids the inter-process contention.  They start by truncating each allocated table, which resets the high-water mark.

Presenting At ODTUG Kscope18 Conference in Orlando, Florida 10-14 June 2018

I’m very excited to have a couple of papers accepted at this year’s ODTUG Kscope18 Conference in sunny and likely very hot Orlando, Florida between 10-14 June 2018. I’m excited because I’ve been to a few of these conferences before and they have always been excellent events. As a mainly Oracle Database kinda guy, it’s […]

A look into oracle redo, part 7: adaptive log file sync

This is the seventh part of a blog series about oracle redo.

Adaptive log file sync is a feature that probably came with Oracle version 11.2. Probably means I looked at the undocumented parameters of Oracle version 11.1 and do not see any of the ‘_adaptive_log_file_sync*’ parameters. It was actually turned off by default with versions 11.2.0.1 and 11.2.0.2, and was turned on by default since version 11.2.0.3.

How to use the core functionality of RANDOM_NINJA

In the second video on RANDOM_NINJA I show how to use the core functionality in the 3 main
packages: core_random, text_random and time_random.

How to use the core functionality of RANDOM_NINJA

In the second video on RANDOM_NINJA I show how to use the core functionality in the 3 main
packages: core_random, text_random and time_random.

Reference Costs

The partitioning option “partition by reference” is a very convenient option which keeps acquiring more cute little features, such as cascading truncates and cascading splits, as time passes – but what does it cost and would you use it if you don’t really need to.

When reference partitioning came into existence many years ago, I had already seen several performance disasters created by people’s enthusiasm for surrogate keys and the difficulties this introduced for partition elimination; so my first thought was that this was a mechanism that would have a hugely beneficial effect on systems which (in 20:20 – or 6:6 if you’re European – hindsight) had been badly designed and would otherwise need a lot of re-engineering to use partitioning effectively.