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February 2018

JAN18: Database 11gR2 PSU, 12cR1 ProactiveBP, 12cR2 RU

If you want to apply the latest patches (and you should), you can go to the My Oracle Support Recommended Patch Advisor. But sometimes it is not up-todate. For example, for 12.1.0.2 only the PSU is displayed and not the Proactive Bundle Patch, which is highly recommended. And across releases, the names have changed and can be misleading: PSU for 11.2.0.4 (no Proactive Bundle Patch except for Engineered Systems). 12.1.0.2 can have SPU, PSU, or Proactive BP but the latest is highly recommended, especially now that it includes the adaptive statistics patches. 12.2.0.1 introduce the new RUR and RU, the latest one being the one recommended.

Where in the World is Goth Girl- Cleveland Edition

I’ve returned from SQL Saturday Cleveland after presenting “Linux Performance Essentials for the SQL Server DBA”.  The event had 30% women speakers, which is incredible for a technical event.  I’m thrilled with the attendance and although my session went through a lot of Linux in an hour, people didn’t leave looking like their brains were going to explode, so mission accomplished.

Multitenant, PDB, ‘save state’, services and standby databases

Creating – and using – your own services has always been the recommendation. You can connect to a database without a service name, though the instance SID, but this is not what you should do. Each database registers its db_unique_name as a service, and you can use it to connect, but it is always better to create your own application service(s). In multitenant, each PDB registers its name as a service, but the recommendation is still there: create your own services, and connect with your services.
I’ll show in this blog post what happens if you use the PDB name as a service and the standby database registers to the same listener as the primary database. Of course, you can workaround the non-unique service names by registering to different listeners. But this just hides the problem. The main reason to use services is to be independent from physical attributes, so being forced to assign a specific TCP/IP port is not better than using an instance SID.

A look into Oracle redo, part 2: the discovery of the KCRFA structure

This is the second post in a series of blogposts on Oracle database redo internals. If you landed on this blogpost without having read the first blogpost, here is a link to the first blogpost: https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/01/29/a-look-into-oracle-redo-part-1-redo-allocation-latches/ The first blogpost contains all the versions used and a synopsis on what the purpose of this series of blogposts is.

In the first part, I showed how the principal access to the public redo strands is controlled by redo allocation latches, and showed a snippet of trace information of memory accesses of a foreground session when using the first public redo strand:

UNDO sizing

90% databases that I see for the first time have the same issue with UNDO tablespace: it’s over sized, yet still causing infamous ORA-1555 errors at times. Here is why.

NULL’s vs NOT NULL’s and Performance

When it comes to giving the cost based optimiser the best possible chance to make the “right” decisions, many DBA’s are diligent in keeping statistics up to date, using histograms where appropriate, creating more indexes (or removing surplus indexes).

However one often neglected area is that the the null-ness of columns also impacts the optimiser decisions. NULL and NOT NULL do more than just act as constraints, they also add (or detract) to the value of indexes on those columns. Here’s an example of how the null-ness of a column impacts optimizer decisions. I have a table T which is a copy of DBA_OBJECTS, indexed on OBJECT_ID.

Friday Philosophy – Condoning Bad Behaviour

I used to work with a man called Nick(*). Nick was friendly enough, he was good at programming and he had very few annoying personal habits. Nick was easy to work with.