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August 2015

My Glamorous Life : Just so you don’t misunderstand…

If you’ve subscribed to my YouTube channel, you will have noticed me posting some videos with the title “My Glamorous Life : …“.

I had several distinct plans for this trip:

Lima to Amsterdam

I left the hotel a little late, but the airport was literally across the road, so it was no big deal. Having a business class ticket meant I checked in immediately (+1) and even had time to hit the lounge (+2). High class swanky time, and without needing to be signed in for once. :)

Boarding the flight was pretty straight forward. Once again, the business class ticket gives priority boarding (+3), without me having to tag along with Debra.

Parallel Projection

A recent case at a client reminded me of something that isn't really new but not so well known - Oracle by default performs evaluation at the latest possible point in the execution plan.So if you happen to have expressions in the projection of a simple SQL statement that runs parallel it might be counter-intuitive that by default Oracle won't evaluate the projection in the Parallel Slaves but in the Query Coordinator - even if it was technically possible - because the latest possible point is the SELECT operation with the ID = 0 of the plan, which is always performed by the Query Coordinator.Of course, if you make use of expressions that can't be evaluated in parallel or aren't implemented for parallel evaluation, then there is no other choice than doing this in the Query Coordinator.The specific case in question was a generic expo

Cusco to Lima

It was a 3:30 start, which after broken sleep and the events of the day before had me a little worried. We got a taxi to the airport in Cusco, which is the coldest airport I have ever experienced. After checking in, we headed to the departure gate, which was also freezing. The departure gate was interesting. The lady brought her own laptop, microphone and speaker to make the announcements. :)

We got on to the coldest plane I’ve ever been on. I don’t remember seeing people on a plane in coats and woolly hats before. :) After a quick flight we got to Lima airport, where I said goodbye to Debra, who is flying back to Northern Ireland, via Miami and London.

Machu Picchu

At about 04:00 we were queuing for the bus ride to the base of Machu Picchu. I started to feel a bit ill again. A little after 05:00 we were on the bus driving up to the base of Machu Picchu. It took about 30 mins to get there, most of which I spent trying not to puke.

I was very dissapointed with the entrance to Machu Picchu. It felt like the entrance to a theme park. There was even Machu Picchu WiFi. We were there to witness wonder and spectacle, but seemed to be getting Disneyland. After being on the verge all morning, I puked and felt much better.

Lima to Cusco to Machu Picchu

With the tour over, Debra and I had arranged to spend a couple of days visiting Machu Picchu, before heading home.

We woke up early on Friday to get a flight from Lima to Cusco. We arrived at the airport in plenty of time, got to our gate and saw a list of delayed and cancelled flights to Cusco. The weather was too bad in Cusco for flights to take off and land. Luckily, after a while the weather apparently cleared in Cusco, allowing us to take a flight which arrived about 1 hour late.

Mr DISTINCT might not be your friend

Whenever you have the need to use the DISTINCT keyword, its worth just pausing for a second, and making sure that you are not hiding just a larger issue. It actually might represent either incorrect use of SQL or incorrect assumptions from the data model.

Consider the following example

SELECT DISTINCT d.dname
FROM   emp e, dept d
WHERE  e.ename = 'SMITH'
AND    e.deptno = d.deptno

The query is certainly valid, but when I see "distinct" I ask myself the following questions:

Has the DISTINCT has been added in an attempt to only return a single row ?, ie, is someone working under the assumption being that an employee name can only refer to a single department ? Unless there is a unique constraint on the ENAME column, then we can still just as easily get multiple rows back (even with the DISTINCT), so the SQL will be a "sleeping problem" in the application until the data causes it to fail.

Because the DISTINCT keyword here:

Oracle Database Developer Choice Awards

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Please go to http://bit.ly/OracleDevChoice to learn more about the awards and how to nominate people.

VirtualBox 5.0.2

VirtualBox 5.0.2 has been released. It’s the first maintenance release for the 5.0 version.

Downloads and changelog in the usual places.

Cheers

Tim…


VirtualBox 5.0.2 was first posted on August 14, 2015 at 6:29 pm.
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Friday Philosophy – Building for the Future

I started my Oracle working life as a builder – a Forms & Reports Builder (briefly on SQL*Forms V2.3 but thankfully within a month or two we moved up to SQL*Forms V3, SQL*reportwriter V1.1 and SQL*Menu 5 – who remembers SQL*Menu?). Why were we called Builders? I guess as you could get a long way with those tools by drawing screens, utilising the (pretty much new) RI in the underlying Oracle V7 to enforce simple business rules and adding very simple triggers – theoretically not writing much in the way of code. It was deemed to be more like constructing stuff out of bits I guess. But SQL*Forms V3 had PL/SQL V1 built in and on that project we used it a *lot*.