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August 2014

F5 Load Balancer Training Course : Day 1

As I suspected, I’m the only person on the course that doesn’t know what a network is. :) If I had not been tinkering with the reverse proxies over the last year I would have been pretty much lost.

The course itself is well structured and the teacher is good. The fact I’ve not flounced out in a huff is testament to that. :) The pattern will be quite familiar to anyone who has been on a hands-on course before. Discuss a topic with slides, then do a hands-on lab that works through that stuff.

WordPress 3.9.2

WordPress 3.9.2 has been released. It’s a security release with a bunch of important fixes for some nasties. The changelog is here.

Depending on your setup, you might have automatically updated anyway. If not, go on to your dashboard and give it a nudge. :)

Cheers

Tim…

Guardians of the Galaxy

I’ve just got back from seeing Guardians of the Galaxy.

Take note Sci-Fi movie makers! This is your competition! This is what you need to aim to outdo!

It’s very cool. It looks great. You quickly start to give a crap about the characters. It doesn’t take itself too seriously.

Favourite Character: Groot. I challenge anyone to come out of the film and not want to say, “I am Groot”, in response to any situation. :)

I didn’t really fancy it when I saw the trailers. A couple of people were talking about how good the reviews were, so I thought I would give it a go. I’m glad I did. It’s excellent!

Cheers

Tim…

Why Write-Through is still the default Flash Cache Mode on #Exadata X-4

The Flash Cache Mode still defaults to Write-Through on Exadata X-4 because most customers are better suited that way – not because Write-Back is buggy or unreliable. Chances are that Write-Back is not required, so we just save Flash capacity that way. So when you see this

SLOB Data Loading Case Studies – Part I. A Simple Concurrent + Parallel Example.

Introduction

This is Part I in a short series of posts dedicated to loading SLOB data.  A link to Part II is provided below.

The SLOB loader is called setup.sh and it is, by default a concurrent, data loader. The SLOB configuration file parameter controlling the number of concurrent data loading threads is called LOAD_PARALLEL_DEGREE. In retrospect I should have named the parameter LOAD_CONCURRENT_DEGREE because unless Oracle Parallel Query is enabled there is no parallelism in the data loading procedure. But if LOAD_PARALLEL_DEGREE is assigned a value greater than 1 there is concurrent data loading.

F5 Load Balancer Training Course

I’m on an F5 Load Balancer training course for the next 3 days.

I have no idea what to expect and to be honest, I really don’t think I should be here. :) With the exception of a bit of fiddling with Apache reverse proxies, I don’t really know anything about this stuff, so I’m not sure if this will go over my head or be intensely slow and boring…

If anything comes out of it worth blogging about I certainly will.

A brief history of time^H^H Oracle session statistics

I didn’t intend to write another blog post yesterday evening at all, but found something that was worth sharing and got me excited… And when I started writing I intended it to be a short post, too.

If you have been digging around Oracle session performance counters a little you undoubtedly noticed how their number has increased with every release, and even with every patch set. Unfortunately I don’t have a 11.1 system (or earlier) at my disposal to test, but here is a comparison of how Oracle has instrumented the database. I have already ditched my 12.1.0.1 system as well, so no comparison there either :( This is Oracle on Linux.

The script

SLOB Deployment – A Picture Tutorial.

SLOB can be obtained at this link: Click here.

This post is just a simple set of screenshots I recently took during a fresh SLOB deployment. There have been a tremendous number of SLOB downloads lately so I thought this might be a helpful addition to go along with the documentation. The examples I show herein are based on a 12.1.0.2 Oracle Database but these principles apply equally to 12.1.0.1 and all Oracle Database 11g releases as well.

Metering and Chargeback

In the past few posts, I’ve covered setting up PDBaaS, using the Self Service portal with PDBaaS, setting up Schema as a Service, and using the Self Service Portal with Schema as a Service, all of these using Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 12c release 12.1.0.4.

More Oracle Multitenant Changes (12.1.0.2)

When I wrote about the remote cloning of PDBs, I said I would probably be changing some existing articles. Here’s a change I’ve done already.

There are also new articles.

I’m sure there will be some more little pieces coming out in the next few days…