Search

Top 60 Oracle Blogs

Recent comments

September 2012

DBMS_APPLICATION_INFO for Instrumentation

I just wanted to put up a post about DBMS_APPLICATION_INFO. This is a fantastic little built-in PL/SQL package that Oracle has provided since Oracle 8 to allow you to instrument your code. i.e record what it is doing. I’m a big fan of DBMS_APPLICATION_INFO and have used it several times to help identify where in an application time is being spent and how that pattern of time has altered.

Some PL/SQL developers use it and some don’t. It seems to me that it’s use comes down to where you work, as most PL/SQL developers are aware of it – but not everyone uses it (a friend of mine made the comment recently that “all good PL/SQL developers use it“. I can understand his point but don’t 100% agree).

Bugs

Last week I published some code that demonstrated how a fast refresh of an aggregate materialized view could fail because of the internal use of the sys_op_map_nonnull() function. In some ways it was an easy problem to explain because all you had to do was trace the call to refresh and see what was going on. Today’s bug is completely different – it’s virtually impossible to see the connection between the failure and its cause. Here (as a cut-n-paste) is an example of what happens when the bug appears:

execute dbms_stats.gather_schema_stats(user)
*
ERROR at line 1:
ORA-01760: illegal argument for function
ORA-06512: at "SYS.DBMS_STATS", line 13336
ORA-06512: at "SYS.DBMS_STATS", line 13682
ORA-06512: at "SYS.DBMS_STATS", line 13760
ORA-06512: at "SYS.DBMS_STATS", line 13719
ORA-06512: at line 1

On the Topic of Programming 2

September 2, 2012 (Back to the Previous Post in the Series) (Forward to the Next Post in the Series) Over the course of the last six months I developed several efficiency reports for the machining facility where I work, measuring the average time required to complete a customer’s part compared to the engineering standard “target” run [...]

Oracle Big Data Appliance Delivery Day

It’s been about two and a half years since Enkitec took delivery of our first Exadata. (I blogged about it here: Weasle Stomping Day) Getting our hands on Exadata was very cool for all of us geeks. A lot has changed since then, but we’re still a bunch of geeks at heart and so this week we indulged our geekdom once again with the delivery of our Big Data Appliance (BDA). In case you haven’t heard about it, Oracle has released an engineered system that is designed to host “Big Data” (which is not my favorite term, but I’ll have to save that for some other time).  The Hadoop ecosystem has taken off in the last couple of years and this is Oracle’s initial foray into the arena.