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April 2012

The Magic of Doing One Thing At A Time

I just read an article from the Harvard Business Review entitled "The Magic of Doing One Thing at a Time" and thought it was excellent. I highly recommend reading the whole article (it's not long) but here are a few "policies worth promoting" from the article:

1. Maintain meeting discipline.
Among other things, this includes starting and ending meetings at a "precise" time and insisting that all digital devices be turned off throughout the meeting. Amen!
2. Stop demanding or expecting instant responsiveness at every moment of the day.

The Cabin in the Woods…

The adverts would have you believe The Cabin in the Woods is a “Game Changer”, “Astounding” and lots of other things that would make you think you are about to witness something that will change the course of movie history. That fact is, it’s just another teen slasher movie. It’s quite a good one as it goes, but there is nothing revolutionary here. I could have been watching any of the Scream films and it would have been pretty much the same experience.

If you like teen slashers, I think you will like this. To get maximum enjoyment, avoid any trailers, reviews with spoilers and hype.

Cheers

Tim…

Fedora 16, Nouveau Driver and GNOME 3…

I did an update of the my Fedora 16 machines this morning and I’ve got GNOME 3 back in full effect, rather than the fallback option. It seems the updated Nouveau Driver was included in the update, so I don’t have to wait for Fedora 17 to get me back on GNOME shell, and I won’t be requiring software rendering of GNOME shell when I do upgrade. Happy days…

Cheers

Tim…




Repairman Jack : The Haunted Air…

The Haunted Air is the sixth book in the Repairman Jack series by F. Paul Wilson.

It seems the world is quite literally going to Hell and Jack is one of the few people that might be able to stop it. This latest adventure sees Jack getting drawn into investigating the ritual killing of children, phony mediums and a ghost interfering in his private life.

On the plus side, the book was well paced and I was desperate to know what happens next. On the negative side, the content is really heavy and disturbing. There are elements that are very similar to one of the Felix Castor books, but with a much darker edge.

Exadata Smart Scan predicate offloading and sequence.NEXTVAL

There was a question in the twitter-sphere about whether using sequences (sequence.NEXTVAL) in your select query’s projection list would somehow disable smart scans happening?
The answer is no, sequence use with smart scans works just fine. The smart scan offloading applies to data retrieval row sources (and filtering) only and nothing else. So, what you have in the query’s projection list (the sequence use for example), does not directly affect the smart scan decision.

Exadata Smart Scan predicate offloading and sequence.NEXTVAL

There was a question in the twitter-sphere about whether using sequences (sequence.NEXTVAL) in your select query’s projection list would somehow disable smart scans happening?
The answer is no, sequence use with smart scans works just fine. The smart scan offloading applies to data retrieval row sources (and filtering) only and nothing else. So, what you have in the query’s projection list (the sequence use for example), does not directly affect the smart scan decision.

Exadata Smart Scan predicate offloading and sequence.NEXTVAL

There was a question in the twitter-sphere about whether using sequences (sequence.NEXTVAL) in your select query’s projection list would somehow disable smart scans happening?

The answer is no, sequence use with smart scans works just fine. The smart scan offloading applies to data retrieval row sources (and filtering) only and nothing else. So, what you have in the query’s projection list (the sequence use for example), does not directly affect the smart scan decision. Just like any other operations like sorting, grouping etc, do not have anything to do with smart scans and don’t disable their use. Smart scans are only related to data retrieval and any other operations do not affect them.

Exadata Smart Scan predicate offloading and sequence.NEXTVAL

There was a question in the twitter-sphere about whether using sequences (sequence.NEXTVAL) in your select query’s projection list would somehow disable smart scans happening?
The answer is no, sequence use with smart scans works just fine. The smart scan offloading applies to data retrieval row sources (and filtering) only and nothing else. So, what you have in the query’s projection list (the sequence use for example), does not directly affect the smart scan decision.

Exadata Smart Scan predicate offloading and sequence.NEXTVAL

There was a question in the twitter-sphere about whether using sequences (sequence.NEXTVAL) in your select query’s projection list would somehow disable smart scans happening?
The answer is no, sequence use with smart scans works just fine. The smart scan offloading applies to data retrieval row sources (and filtering) only and nothing else. So, what you have in the query’s projection list (the sequence use for example), does not directly affect the smart scan decision.

RMAN restore spfile from autobackup and compatible weirdness

Prompted by a recent interview I wanted to perform a little test with RMAN, and incrementally updated backups. I created a 11.2.0.2.5 database on my Linux (OEL 5.5) test system and refreshed my understanding of this most useful rman feature (which is for another post).

So after I was happy with the working of the incrementally updated image copies I decided to see if I could restore my database with those. Time to use “drop database”, which removes spfile, data files, temp files and the control files. Tabula rasa!

But it didn’t matter I thought: I have controlfile/spfile autobackups and fully recovered image copies plus all the archived logs in the FRA. What could possibly go wrong? Well it took me 30 minutes to get the database back.

ORA-4031