Search

Top 60 Oracle Blogs

Recent comments

July 2011

Tweeting

I think I made a mistake. I recently set up a twitter account @KerryOracleGuy (of course plain old @KerryOsborne was already taken). I only signed up because I wanted to see what @TanelPoder was saying. I wasn’t planning on tweeting at all when I signed up. I just wanted to see what Tanel was saying. Well the first day a bunch of people signed up to follow me. The whole thing seems a little strange. Although it is pretty easy to keep up with what people are doing. So I guess I’m going to give it a try and see if I like it. I have tweeted a few times and I think I am starting to get the hang of it (it’s hard to teach an old dog new tricks). I have figured out how to use tiny url’s now. I think I need to figure out how to tweet pictures as well. I’ve heard there is a Twit Pic for doing that. If I use it though, I guess that would make me a “Twit Pic-er”, which I don’t much like the sound of.

RMOUG 2011: Pythian Raffle Results

I’m following up on a conference almost half a year later — try to bet that! Actually, this blog post was written more than 3 months ago and was sitting in my drafts waiting the moment I understand why I really wrote it. 3 months later… I still don’t know but I thought I should [...]

Security Webinar...

Tomorrow - July 28th at 10:00 PDT (13:00 East Coast US Time) - I'll be delivering a free Webinar on database security. If you are interested - you can register using this link: http://event.on24.com/r.htm?e=328712&s=1&k=D11C69EADAB1A25981D9E53966EE5D15&partnerref=blog1_sec_dbsecmulti

Hope to virtually see you there!

RAC

One of the biggest problems wih RAC is getting it installed. It’s not something I do often – which means it takes me far too long to do when I need to do it. But sometimes you’ve just got to go ahead and find the time. Three or four years ago I built myself a RAC stack – four nodes, because that’s the minimum number of sensibel testing.  (If you want to know why: two nodes is a very special case because you don’t have to worry about three-way negotiations; three nodes is a special case because if you’re testing failure scnerios then three nodes fails to two nodes – which is a special case. So four nodes is the smallest generic RAC installation – and that’s ignoring the question of standby systems, of course.)

My previous RAC stack, costing me about £2,000, is pictured is pictured on the left.

That’s four boxes I built from kits, an old laptop to do iSCSI emulation, and a spare 250GB external drive. I’ve got two routers there, one for the public network, one for the private; the boxes have 2GB of RAM and dual core pentium chips, and the O/S is Redhat. When I use it I tend to use Cygwin on my laptop and run up lots of telnet sessions. The system is very good for testing failures and node evictions because even with two big fans and a 4″ air gap (the white bits are polystyrene blocks) the third box down tends to overheat after about 45 minutes and crash – so most of the time I’m actually only using a three-node RAC.

Anyway, the reason for showing you this picture is because I’ve finally retired the old boxes and got some new kit. My new RAC stack,  costing only £1,600, is on the right. As you can see, it’s a laptop (if you’ve got a big lap).

It’s got 16GB of RAM, 2 x 500GB discs, and a 2nd generation i7 quad-core CPU which – according to Windows 7 Pro - is also capable of double-threading. I haven’t actually had time to set up the RAC system yet (I think I’ll have a couple of free days for that around the end of August), I’ve only got as far as installing a basic Linux virtual machine as the first step in the process. But for the photo I created four virtual Windows XP Pro machines under VMWare, then started  six Oracle instances across the four machines. The battery lasted about 90 minutes, but apart from that I think I’ve got a good indication that it will handle a four-node linux RAC with a windows Grid Control front-end if I want it to.

Footnote: Every time I buy some new kit (which is about once a year) I am stunned by the rate of change. My first PC cost me £2.300: it was an Apple II with the full 64KB of RAM, 2 x 360KB floppy disc drives (5.25″), 1MHz CPU (6502) and the special graphics card that allowed something like 320 x 250 pixels – and Visicalc was still faster than Excel on my latest laptop.

Free Webinar with Cary Millsap, Kerry Osborne and Karen Morton

http://dboptimizer.com/2011/07/27/free-webinar-with-cary-millsap-kerry-osborne-a
Event date: 
Thu, 2011-07-28

Thursday, July 28 11:00am PDT  :  Register Here
Oracle performance tuning and optimization is not always easy. Now’s your chance to hear from people who have been there and ask them the questions that are keeping you up at night.
Three senior DBAs and performance tuning specialists and members of the elite OakTable network will discuss best performance optimization and tuning practices for the Oracle® Database.
Participate in this online roundtable to gain specific insight and learn about advanced performance tips for the Oracle® Database. During this event you will:

  • Learn how to improve Oracle performance and availability while improving productivity
  • Understand about best practices and tips from very senior Oracle DBAs from the OakTable network
  • Interact with experts by submitting questions, prior and during the webinar, and sharing your more painful performance optimization challenges with our panel

About our panelists:
Karen Morton is a Senior DBA Performance and Tuning Specialist for Fidelity Information Services. Having used Oracle since the early 90’s, she began consulting and teaching others how to use Oracle over a decade ago. Karen is a frequent speaker at conferences and user groups, an Oracle ACE, and a member of the OakTable network. Karen has co-authored three books from Apress: Beginning Oracle SQL, Pro Oracle SQL and Expert Oracle Practices: Oracle Database Administration from the Oak Table. She blogs at karenmorton.blogspot.com.
Cary Millsap has been part of the Oracle community since 1989. He is the founder and president of Method R Corporation. He is widely known in the Oracle community as a speaker, educator, consultant, and writer. He wrote Optimizing Oracle Performance  with Jeff Holt, and he is a co-author of Oracle Insights: Tales of the Oak Table . Cary is also an architect of the Method R software tools that help professionals around the world manage Oracle performance. He blogs at carymillsap.blogspot.com and tweets at twitter.com/CaryMillsap.
Kerry Osborne began working with Oracle in 1982. He has worked both as a developer and a DBA. For the past several years, he has been focused on understanding Oracle internals and solving performance problems. He is an OakTable member and is the author of an upcoming Apress book Expert Oracle Exadata. Mr. Osborne is also a co-founder of Enkitec, an Oracle-focused consulting company headquartered in Dallas, Texas. He blogs at kerryosborne.oracle-guy.com.OakTable link: http://www.oaktable.net/users/kerry-osborne.
Register today. And don’t forget to fill in your questions on the webinar registration form.

Free Webinar with Cary Millsap, Kerry Osborne and Karen Morton

Thursday, July 28 11:00am PDT  :  Register Here

Last post I talked about the  Method R performance tuning tools for Oracle.  The creation of these tools was spear headed by Cary Milsap  and now Cary will be talking live, for free, in two days on  a webinar  along with Kerry Osborne and Karen Morton.

Get the skinny on Oracle performance tuning straight from the horses mouth!

This will be a techincal webinar with good technical content. The webinar is being hosted by  Embarcadero.  Here is the writeup on the webinar from Embarcadero.

 


 

Oracle performance tuning and optimization is not always easy. Now’s your chance to hear from people who have been there and ask them the questions that are keeping you up at night.

Three senior DBAs and performance tuning specialists and members of the elite OakTable network will discuss best performance optimization and tuning practices for the Oracle® Database.

Participate in this online roundtable to gain specific insight and learn about advanced performance tips for the Oracle® Database. During this event you will:

  • Learn how to improve Oracle performance and availability while improving productivity
  • Understand about best practices and tips from very senior Oracle DBAs from the OakTable network
  • Interact with experts by submitting questions, prior and during the webinar, and sharing your more painful performance optimization challenges with our panel

About our panelists:
Karen Morton is a Senior DBA Performance and Tuning Specialist for Fidelity Information Services. Having used Oracle since the early 90’s, she began consulting and teaching others how to use Oracle over a decade ago. Karen is a frequent speaker at conferences and user groups, an Oracle ACE, and a member of the OakTable network. Karen has co-authored three books from Apress: Beginning Oracle SQL, Pro Oracle SQL and Expert Oracle Practices: Oracle Database Administration from the Oak Table. She blogs at karenmorton.blogspot.com.

Cary Millsap has been part of the Oracle community since 1989. He is the founder and president of Method R Corporation. He is widely known in the Oracle community as a speaker, educator, consultant, and writer. He wrote Optimizing Oracle Performance  with Jeff Holt, and he is a co-author of Oracle Insights: Tales of the Oak Table . Cary is also an architect of the Method R software tools that help professionals around the world manage Oracle performance. He blogs at carymillsap.blogspot.com and tweets at twitter.com/CaryMillsap.

Kerry Osborne began working with Oracle in 1982. He has worked both as a developer and a DBA. For the past several years, he has been focused on understanding Oracle internals and solving performance problems. He is an OakTable member and is the author of an upcoming Apress book Expert Oracle Exadata. Mr. Osborne is also a co-founder of Enkitec, an Oracle-focused consulting company headquartered in Dallas, Texas. He blogs at kerryosborne.oracle-guy.com.OakTable link: http://www.oaktable.net/users/kerry-osborne.

Register today. And don’t forget to fill in your questions on the webinar registration form.

 

In Praise of Clones

I’m all alone, so are we all We’re all clones All are one and one are all ~ Alice Cooper Two separate discussions, one at work and one around the virtual OakTable , have made me aware that maybe not as many Oracle professionals as I imagined are aware that Oracle provides a facility to [...]

InSync11 Conference Fast Approaching (Khe Sanh)

Just a short note to remind everyone that the excellent InSync11 Conference to be held this year at the Sydney Convention Centre on 16-17 August 2011 is but a few weeks away. With a great lineup of experts such as Tom Kyte, Tim Hall, Graham Wood, Chris Muir, Connor McDonald, Tony Jambu, Marcelle Kratochvil to name but a very [...]

Fitness Update (July 2011)…

A number of things to report on the fitness front…

I’ve switched some of my cardio sessions on the elliptical from regular interval training to Tabata Protocol. A little over 2 months ago Dominic Brooks pointed this out to me. I gave it a try then, but I wasn’t fit enough to cope with it. Now it is just a complete nightmare, rather than impossible. :) So general fitness is going really well. There are the obvious ups and downs, but I feel really good about things and I don’t find the gym daunting now. I know I’m going to survive.

I’ve backed off the weight training a bit. There are a couple of reasons for this. First, I was putting on too much muscle. I used to do weights as a kid and I guess the whole muscle memory thing is true. The tubby meat-head thing is not a look I’m interested in. Second, shifting a lot of weight was starting to aggravate my joints. I’ve had operations on my left elbow and knee and both of them have been playing up for a couple of days after doing heavy lifting. Those two factors combined seemed like pretty clear signals that weight training is no longer the right thing for me.

To replace the absent weight training I’ve been doing some circuit training, mostly using functional training exercises. It feels pretty good and isn’t freaking out my joints so far. I’m not a gym-class type of guy, but I figured I need some technique coaching, so yesterday evening I went to a kettlebells class. The bruises on my arms and shoulders this morning would suggest my technique is not quite right, but I’ve already learned a bunch of stuff, so that’s good. Two visits to the gym yesterday was not a great idea, but I’m glad I got off my ass and made it to the kettlebells class. It would have been very easy to leave it for next week. :)

As part of the functional training I’ve also started to do handstands again. I used to be pretty good at them, thanks to the yoga, but as I got heavier they got a bit scary and my center of gravity shifted somewhat. Now I’m hitting them pretty well and walking on my hands pretty comfortably. I can even pull out a few half-handstand-pushups on a good day. I was in the dance studio practicing handstands and someone asked me if I was a gymnast, which cracked me up. Is there a gymnastics for fatties competition I can enter?

I’ll be in Australia next month and I feel the need to manage some people’s (Chris Muir and Connor McDonald) expectations.

  • If you last saw me about 5 months ago, I will look like I’ve lost quite a bit of weight.
  • If you last saw me about 2 year ago, you will think I look about the same.
  • If you last saw me 3+ years ago, you will probably think I’ve gained some weight.
Based on that, you should not be expecting to see “the new svelte” version of me Connor. :)

Still another 30 years and 30 pounds to go… :)

Cheers

Tim…




HOWTO: Count all Rows in all Tables – The XMLDB Way

Someone beat me to it in this good post: Oracle Tip: Counting ROWS for all tables in a Schema . So here a reminder for me where to find it.