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April 2010

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Ordina

ORA600 bvba

Miracle A/S

Scale Abilities

Scale Abilities is a unique IT consultancy and services company, that distinguishes itself in the depth and breadth of knowledge it can apply to solving customer problems. Scale Abilities provides unparalleled expertise in the implementation of high performance and high availability IT solutions. 
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The Go-Faster Oracle Blog

The PeopleSoft stuff is at blog.psftdba.com. This is the non-PeopleSoft Stuff

Applied Mathematics for Database Professionals

Book: 

This book is about the mathematical foundation of relational databases; it demonstrates how logic and set theory can be used as tools to formally specify database designs, including the data integrity constraints (a main topic of this book). Don't let this scare you of; the book explains the required mathematical concepts with many examples and should be accessible for the regular database professional. It does assume that you are familiar with designing a database.

You'll find three parts in this book:

Edition-Based Redefinition

Upgrading critical applications can be very difficult. One of the main problems is that for reasons of availability, long downtimes cannot be periodically scheduled. Therefore, for such applications, it is desirable to implement online upgrades. This requires that the application in question, as well as any software used by the application (e.g. the database engine) all support online upgrades. Oracle has recognized this problem for years. Unfortunately, up to and including Database 11g Release 1, only a limited number of features have been implemented for that purpose. As of Oracle Database 11g Release 2, this situation has changed greatly. With edition-based redefinition, Oracle Database offers real support for implementing online upgrades. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of this new feature.
Download full article: http://antognini.ch/papers/EditionBasedRedefinition20101204.pdf
 

Statistics on Partitioned Tables - Part 6b - COPY_TABLE_STATS - Mistakes

Sigh ... these posts have become a bit of a mess.

There are so many different bits and pieces I want to illustrate and I've been trying to squeeze them in around normal work. Worse still, because I keep leaving them then coming back to them and re-running tests it's easy to lose track of where I was, despite using more or less the same test scripts each time (any new scripts tend to be sections of the main test script). I suspect my decision to only pull out the more interesting parts of the output has contributed to the difficulties too, but with around 18.5 thousand lines of output, I decided that was more or less essential.

It has got so bad that I noticed the other day that there were a couple of significant errors in the last post which are easy to miss when you're looking at detailed output and must be even less obvious if you're looking at it for the first time.

The fact no-one said much about these errors reinforces my argument with several bloggers that less people read and truly absorb the more technical stuff than they think. They just pick up the messages they need and take more on trust than you might imagine!

So what were the errors? Possibly more important, why did they appear? The mistakes are often as instructive as the successes.

Error 1

This is the tail-end of the subpartition stats at the end of part 5

cursor: pin S waits, sporadic CPU spikes and systematic troubleshooting

I recently consulted one big telecom and helped to solve their sporadic performance problem which had troubled them for some months. It was an interesting case as it happened in the Oracle / OS touchpoint and it was a product of multiple “root causes”, not just one, an early Oracle mutex design bug and a Unix scheduling issue – that’s why it had been hard to resolve earlier despite multiple SRs opened etc.

cursor: pin S waits, sporadic CPU spikes and systematic troubleshooting

I recently consulted one big telecom and helped to solve their sporadic performance problem which had troubled them for some months. It was an interesting case as it happened in the Oracle / OS touchpoint and it was a product of multiple “root causes”, not just one, an early Oracle mutex design bug and a Unix scheduling issue – that’s why it had been hard to resolve earlier despite multiple SRs opened etc.

Martin Meyer, their lead DBA, posted some info about the problem and technical details, so before going on, you should read his blog entry and read my comments below after this:

Problem:

So, the problem was, that occasionally the critical application transactions which should have taken very short time in the database (<1s), took 10-15 seconds or even longer and timed out.

Symptoms: