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October 2009

Extra! Extra! Oracle Closed World today.... on Cloud

We had planned not to have any OCW presentations today in order not to steal Larry's audience from his planned keynote, but we're doing it anyway.

It's at 1200 hours, NOT 1300 hours as usual.

More details via text messages later, including todays codeword. If you want text messages from me for the OCW sessions, send me a text/SMS on +45 25277100.

Cloud computing is 'hot'. So is Larry when he talks about it on YouTube. Funny as Hell, actually.

There are at least these two videos. They are partly overlapping, but that doesn't matter- you'll want to see him do this standup routine a couple of times, trust me:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0FacYAI6DY0
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UYa6gQC14o

Which is why today, at the secret location, Oracle Closed World will present a couple of guys that know everything about 'the cloud'.

Mogens

OOW Day2

Why do you come to Open World? I'm sure we will get all kinds of reasons, as many as there are stars in the sky. Some predominant themes are - getting to know more about the Oracle (or related) technologies by attending sessions, reconnecting with old friends and building networking. Of course, getting freebies from the Exhibit Halls, I'm sure, can't be far behind as a motivator.

I come to OOW for all those reasons as well. But high up in my list is the visit to the Exhibit Halls. No; not for the tee-shirts that do not fit me and graphics I don't really dig. I visit the demogrounds and exhibit halls to know about the products and tools that I should be aware of. Where else would you find 1000+ companies advertising the products at one place? Sure, I can call them and find out; but ho do I find them? OOW exhibit halls are prime "hunting" grounds to look for new ideas and tools that I should be interested in; or at least be aware of. I can not only look at the tools; I can actually get some relevant technical facts in 5 minutes which might take weeks of scheduling and hours of marketing talk. And, if I decide the product is not relevant; I can always walk away. I have the privilege of walking away; they don't. If I call them to my office, "they" have that option; not me :) If I find something attractive, I can always follow up and get to know more.

Oracle demogrounds are even better. Not only I can meet Oracle PMs there; but the people who never come out to the public world - developers, development managers, architects and so on. These unsung heroes are mostly the reason why Oracle is what it is now. I meet the known faces, get to know new ones and establish new relationships. They hear from me what customers want and I learn the innards of some features I am curious about.

So, I spent almost the whole day yesterday navigating through demo grounds and exhibit halls. I could cover only a small fraction. In between I had to attend some meetings at work. Going to OOW is never "going away". I wish it was.

And Now For Something Completely Different…

So just a short post today, more of an announcement…

At 11.05am on Wednesday 2nd December, I will co-present a talk at the UKOUG conference with Tanel Poder. OK, so nothing particularly earth-shattering there. However, we’ve decided to do something a little bit different with the creative process. The talk is entitled “The Oracle Wait Interface Is Useless (sometimes)”, and is a subject that both Tanel and I have been working on separately for a little while. The premise is this: The wait interface is great for ‘slow’ waits, but what about waits that are not instrumented by the wait interface? What about waits that are not waits from Oracle’s perspective, such as reading a page of memory? What about pure inefficiency? There is, of course, the concept of DB Time, but it is not currently granular enough.

So, you probably can see the idea behind the presentation: The goal is to present some alternative diagnostic techniques to determine the cause of poor performance. We happen to both have similar ideas on this, and they don’t just stop at Oracle.

So here’s the new concept, at least for us: We are going to write the content for the presentation as a tag team effort between our two blogs. Airing our dirty laundry in public, so to speak. We think this will give a fairly unique opportunity for public comment before the presentation is actually given!

So, over to Tanel for part one…

OOW09 - RAC Performance Tuning

For all those who came to my session - many, many thanks. There is no better sight for a presenter than to see a roomful of attendees, especially with people standing near the walls. The fire marshal was not amused probably; but I was grateful. The harrowing incident of a blue screen of death on my PC - not just once but twice - just before the presentation was about to start was enough to throw me into a panic mode; but the third time was a charm. It worked. Phew!

You can download the presentation here. And while you are there, look around and download some more of my sessions as well.

Thanks a lot once again. I'm off the keynote now.

Oracle Closed World - an underground conference...

I'm here in San Francisco for the Oracle Open World conference along with four other guys from Miracle, the two crazy Miracle Finland guys and some other crazy people - we've rented a couple of big apartments as usual, and are doing work, beer and other essential stuff together.

Last year at Oracle Open World (OOW) my friend Iggy Fernandez, who edits the NOCOUG (Northern California Oracle User Group) magazine/journal, suggested an Oracle Closed World conference, where REAL, TECHNICAL presentations would take place underground in secret locations, using secret passwords, and what have you.

Well, it's here. Monday, Tuesday and Thursdag at a secret location we'll do deep and very technical presentations about various topics. The secret location (which is indeed underground) has the capability to serve beer, by the way.

Let me know if you're interested in hearing more about OCW - email me on mno@MiracleAS.dk or text me on +45 2527 7100.

Mogens

Things you never wanted to know about SAN's...

Here's some information you will try to forget after reading. It explains why SAN's always cause trouble, why "a firmware upgrade" is really a complete change of an OS and therefor really dangerous (and impossible to plan or test for) and more.

From now on, think of the firmware in a SAN as a whole OS, just bigger. Scary, right?

My question to this very smart guy I know was this:

"Could you repeat what OS'es are used in what SAN's for me? And how many code lines the ExaData is using?"

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Oracle OpenWorld first presentation

My first presentation of Oracle OpenWorld is done - it was the one I was most nervous about. It was a keynote, the opening session for the Oracle Develop conference track. As a keynote - I try to make it fun and informative but not a brain dump of all things technical.

The room filled up - which surprised me, it was 9am on a Sunday morning...

And the presentation seemed to work - I ran about 3 minutes over (need to tighten it up a tiny bit) - but it went well. Everyone laughed when they were supposed to, and didn't when they weren't. Even got a bit of spontaneous applause every now and then :)

For those that missed it, or those not at the conference that want to see it - there will be a replay tomorrow (Monday, October 12th) at 11am pacific time - see this link for details.

ID#: S312577
Title: Keynote: Oracle Develop "What Are We Still Doing Wrong"
Track: Oracle Develop: Database
Date: 11-OCT-09
Time: 09:00 - 10:00
Venue: Hilton Hotel
Room: Grand Ballroom B

Aggregating & Purging Batch Timings

Application Engine can collect timing information for the programs being execution. These 'batch timings' can be written to log file and/or tables in the database. I always recommend that this is enabled in all environments. The runtime overhead is very low, and this data is extremely valuable to determine the performance of a system over a period of time, and to identify the pieces of SQL or PeopleCode code that account for the most time. The timing data collected for individual processes can be viewed directly within the Process Monitor component.

Aggregating & Purging Batch Timings

Application Engine can collect timing information for the programs being execution. These 'batch timings' can be written to log file and/or tables in the database. I always recommend that this is enabled in all environments. The runtime overhead is very low, and this data is extremely valuable to determine the performance of a system over a period of time, and to identify the pieces of SQL or PeopleCode code that account for the most time. The timing data collected for individual processes can be viewed directly within the Process Monitor component.

ACE Directors Product Briefing '09

One of the most valuable benefits of being an Oracle ACE Director is the briefings by Oracle Product Managers at the Oracle HQ. This year the briefing was on Friday Oct 9th at Oracle conference center rather than the customary Hilton Hotel.

While I was a little disappointed at the coverage of the database topics, I quickly recovered from the alphabet soup that makes up the netherworld of middleware and tools. However, a surprise visit by Thomas Kurian to address questions from the audience about the various product roadmaps was testimonial that Oracle is dead serious about the ACE Program. That proves the commitment Oracle has made for the user community - very heartening.

As always, Vikky Lira and Lillian Buziak did a wonderful job of organizing the event. Considering about 100 ACE Directors from 20+ countries, that is no small task. Perhaps the highlight of the organization was the detailed briefing sheets Lillian prepared for each one individually, down to what car service one takes and when - simply superb! No amount of thanks will be enough. From the bottom of my heart, thank you, Vikky and Lillian. And, thank you Justin Kestelyn - for kicking off and running the event year after year.